21 Wis. Int'l L.J. 409 (2003)
The Common Heritage of Mankind Principle and Deep Seabed, Outer Space, and Antarctica: Will Developed and Developing Nations Reach a Compromise

handle is hein.journals/wisint21 and id is 417 raw text is: THE COMMON HERITAGE OF MANKIND
PRINCIPLE AND THE DEEP SEABED, OUTER
SPACE, AND ANTARCTICA: WILL
DEVELOPED AND DEVELOPING NATIONS
REACH A COMPROMISE?
JENNIFER FRAKES*
I. INTRODUCTION
Imagine a time, years into the future, when resources are
scarce. People do not have enough fuel to heat their homes or to
power their vehicles. Everyday products are in short supply be-
cause the mineral supply needed to produce them has depleted.
Even more, the accessible freshwater reserves are running dan-
gerously low. How will countries protect the needs of their citi-
zens? One solution will be to derive whatever benefits possible
from the deep seabed, outer space, and Antarctica. But confu-
sion exists as to who owns the rights to these resources. If no
agreement is reached as to how countries will share in the re-
sources of these regions, thought to be owned by all of mankind,
conflict will inevitably ensue.
What happens when certain areas are thought to be owned
by all of mankind? The common heritage of mankind principle
(common heritage principle) is not clearly defined.' Part II of
this article examines the common heritage principle generally.
Part III discusses its application to the deep seabed, and the con-
flict that arose between developed and developing nations2 from
its implementation in the Third United Nations Law of the Sea
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2000; J.D., University of Wisconsin Law
School, 2003. I would like to thank my mother Diane, my grandparents, Paul and
Janet, and Mike for their continued love and support.
PETER MALANCZUK, AKEHURST'S MODERN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL
LAW 208 (7th ed. 1997).
2 Developed nations refer to those with the technology and resources to exploit
common heritage regions. These are typically capitalist countries. Developing
nations are those who lack the means to exploit resources from such areas. These
nations now suffer or have suffered in the past from economic difficulty and have
not yet experienced technological growth comparable to that of developed coun-
tries like the United States.

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 2,700 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Access to this content requires a subscription. Please visit the following page to request a quote or trial:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?