2 Va. Sports & Ent. L.J. 1 (2002-2003)
Racial Profiling, September 11th and the Media: A Critical Race Theory Analysis

handle is hein.journals/virspelj2 and id is 7 raw text is: Article

Racial Profiling, September 11th and the
Media: A Critical Race Theory Analysis
Leonard M. Baynes *
Introduction  ..............................................................................................   2
I. A Critical Race Theory Approach ................................................... 4
II. Racial Profiling Prior to September 11th ........................................ 9
III. The Media Coverage of Racial Profiling Prior to September
11th  .......................................................................................................... . .  13
IV. A Critical Race Analysis of Profiling Prior to September l1th ..... 14
V. How the September 11th Hijackers Escaped Detection .............. 17
A. Mohamed al-Amir Awad al-Sayed Atta ................................ 17
B .  Saeed  A lgham  di  ............................................................................ 18
C. Marwan Yusef Mohammed al-Shehhi ..................................... 19
D .  Z iad  Jarrahi  ..............................................................................  19
Professor of Law, St. John's University School of Law, Jamaica, New York; B.S., New York
University; J.D.-.B.A., Columbia University. The author would like to thank the St. John's
University Law School Black Law Students Association for allowing me to present an earlier
draft of this article at their Civil Rights Symposium in February 2002. In addition, I would like
to thank the members of the University of Virginia Black Law Students Association and the
Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal for inviting me to present at their Black History
Symposium in February 2002, especially Terrica Redfield and Michael McCann. I would like
to thank Professor Kim Forde-Mazrui for his help with this project, and Professor Alex MI.
Johnson, Jr. and Ms. Daphne Maxwell Reid for their insights into these important issues. The
comments of Professors Eric Gouvin and Chris Iijima were also very helpful to me in
completing this project. I also appreciate the comments that I received to a prior draft of this
article at St. John's School of Law Faculty Colloquium. I would also like to thank my research
assistants Casey Laffey and Lily Abramcheyev for assistance with this project. All the views
herein are solely mine, and this article is not meant to suggest that those perpetrators who are
guilty should not be punished. However, in this era of snitching and racial profiling, we have to
be vigilant that we are not making mistakes by targeting the wrong individuals.

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