2005 Utah L. Rev. 573 (2005)
Conceptualizing the Private Police

handle is hein.journals/utahlr2005 and id is 583 raw text is: Conceptualizing the Private Police
Elizabeth E. Joh*
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION                ........................................................................................... 574
II. A     CRITIQUE OF CURRENT APPROACHES ................................................... 578
A. Is It New? .............................................................................................. 579
1.   Compulsory            Community           Protection .................................................. 580
2.   Private Prosecution                Societies ........................................................... 582
3.    Vigilantism        ........................................................................................ 582
4.   Thief-takers and Informants .............................................................. 583
5. Privately         Funded Patrols .................................................................. 584
6.   Conclusion ........................................................................................ 584
B. Is Private Policing                Like     Other Forms of Privatization? ....................... 585
C. Does It Possess an Essential Function? ............................................... 587
1. Loss Instead            of   Crime ....................................................................... 588
2.   Preventive M           ethods ........................................................................... 588
3.   Private Justice ................................................................................... 589
4. Private Property                ............................................................................... 591
5.   Conclusion ........................................................................................ 592
D. Does It Change                 Policing? ................................................................ 592
E. Should         Criminal Procedure Law                      Expand? ........................................... 594
F. Joining         Sociological and              Legal Approaches ......................................... 596
III. AN ANALYTIC MAP: PRIVATE POLICE VARIATION AND TYPES .............. 597
A. Sources of            Variation .............................................................................. 597
1 .  G  o a ls  ................................................................................................. 5      9 7
2. Resources .......................................................................................... 599
3. Legal Powers .................................................................................... 602
4. Jurisdiction ....................................................................................... 607
5.   Organizational Location ................................................................... 608
B. Types of Private Policing                     ...................................................................... 609
1. Protective Policing                 ........................................................................... 611
2. Intelligence Policing ......................................................................... 611
3. Publicly         Contracted          Policing ............................................................ 613
4.   Corporate Policing                ........................................................................... 615
Acting Professor of Law, University of California, Davis (eejoh@ucdavis.edu), J.D., Ph.D.
(Law and Society), New York University; B.A., Yale University. Thanks to Paul Chevigny, David
Garland, Charles Reichmann, and Jerome Skolnick for their comments and suggestions; to the staff
of the U.C. Davis Law Library, especially Erin Murphy, and Rachael Phillips for research
assistance; to the Open Society Institute's Soros Justice Fellowships for early support; and to Dean
Rex Perschbacher, Associate Dean Kevin Johnson, and the U.C. Davis Law School for financial
assistance and institutional support.
573

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