48 Urb. Law. 653 (2016)
Exclusionary Zoning: State and Local Reactions to the Mount Laurel Doctrine

handle is hein.journals/urban48 and id is 671 raw text is: 



                                                                  653




Exclusionary Zoning: State and Local

Reactions to the Mount Laurel Doctrine


Prentiss   Dantzler*


THE  EFFECTS OF  POVERTY  ON INDIVIDUAL  OUTCOMES  HAVE  LONG  BEEN A
TOPIC OF SOCIAL SCIENCE. The intersection of land use planning and pub-
lic policies aimed at addressing the growing problems  of housing  af-
fordability has created much debate and concern. As  the United States
recovers  from the Great  Recession, more  and  more  individuals find
themselves  relying heavily on  governmentally  subsidized, or afford-
able, housing  as a last resort.' Researchers have determined that the
first constructed public housing high-rises of urban America  in cities
like Chicago,  New   York,  Baltimore, Philadelphia, and  Washington
D.C. have  had detrimental effects upon the life chances of its residents
due to their placement in areas of high concentrations of poverty;2 pol-
icies concerning housing developed  into complex  debates about urban
poverty, social isolation, and racial discrimination.3
   Although  public housing  and affordable housing  share the goal of
providing  suitable housing  options  for low-  and moderate-income


  * Prentiss Dantzler (Ph.D Public Affairs-Community Development Department,
Public Policy & Administration at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, at
Camden) is an Associate Professor at Colorado College. The author would like to
thank Robert F. Williams for his insights on previous versions of this paper. Special
acknowledgements should be given to Robert Schaeffer and Julie M. Cheslik for their
comments.
  1. See Who Needs Affordable Housing?, U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Dev.
(HUD), http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program offices/comm-planning/
affordablehousing (last visited Apr. 7, 2016). Families who pay more than
30 percent of their income for housing are considered cost burdened and may have
difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing, transportation and medical
care. An estimated 12 million renter and homeowner households now pay more
than 50 percent of their annual incomes for housing. A family with one full-time
worker earning the minimum wage cannot afford the local fair-market rent for a
two-bedroom apartment anywhere in the United States.
  2. See generally ARNOLD R. HIRSCH, MAKING THE SECOND GHETTO: RACE AND Hous-
ING IN POSTWAR CHICAGO, 1940-1960 (Univ. of Chicago Press 1983); JOHN F. BAUMAN,
PUBIC HOUSING, RACE, AND RENEWAL: URBAN PLANNING IN PHILADELPHIA 1920-1974
(Temple Univ. Press 1987); Ira Goldstein & W. Mark Keeney, Public Housing,
Blacks, and Public Policy: The Historical Ecology of Public Housing in Philadelphia,
in HOUSING DESEGREGATION AND FEDERAL POLICY (John M. Goering, ed., Univ. of North
Carolina Press 1986).
  3. See generally Alexandra M. Curley, Theories of Urban Poverty and Implications
for Public Housing Policy, 32 J. SOCIOLOGY & Soc. WELFARE 97 (2005).

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