24 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 189 (1990-1991)
Sex-Bias Topics in the Criminal Law Course: A Survey of Criminal Law Professors

handle is hein.journals/umijlr24 and id is 197 raw text is: SEX-BIAS TOPICS IN THE CRIMINAL LAW COURSE:
A SURVEY OF CRIMINAL LAW PROFESSORSt
Nancy S. Erickson*
Mary Ann Lamanna**
Incorporating new developments in law into the legal
curriculum is a constant challenge. In recent years, changes
in legal theory and practice have often had gender as a focus.
t This Article reports on some of the findings of a project entitled Sex Bias in the
Criminal Law Course: Bringing the Law School Curriculum into the 1980's, funded
primarily by an Ohio State University Affirmative Action Grant and other funds from
the University and from the Ohio State University College of Law.
The project proceeded in three concurrent steps: a review of seven widely used
criminal law casebooks; a questionnaire survey of all law professors currently
teaching criminal law; and a bibliography that may assist criminal law casebook
authors when they write new editions and to professors of criminal law who wish to
compensate for inadequacies in traditional teaching materials. The Rutgers Law
Review recently published the Final Report of the Project, which contained the
results of the casebook reviews, an overview of the questionnaire findings, and the
bibliography. Erickson, Final Report: Sex Bias in the Teaching of Criminal Law,
42 RUTGERS L. REV. 309 (1990) [hereinafter Erickson, Final Report].
Nancy S. Erickson is the Project Director.    Professor Nadine Taub
(Rutgers-Newark) is the Primary Consultant. Two groups of experts lent their assis-
tance. The Panel consisted of Professors Marina Angel (Temple), Maria Marcus
(Fordham), Vanessa Merton (Pace Law School), Elizabeth Schneider (Brooklyn),
Barbara Underwood (N.Y.U), and Lauren Shapiro, N.Y.U. Law School class of 1986.
The Task Force consisted of Professors Barbara Babcock (Stanford), David Chambers
(Michigan), Victor Streib (Cleveland State), Harry Subin (N.Y.U.), and Charles Jones
(Rutgers-Newark). Professor Mary Ann Lamanna (Nebraska at Omaha) joined the
project in 1986 to further the analysis of the data and to participate in writing the
results of the survey.
The authors also wish to thank the following for their helpful comments on an
original draft of the article: Marina Angel, Maria Marcus, Martha J. Smith, and
Nadine Taub.
For a preliminary report on the Project, see Erickson, Legal Education: The
Last Academic Bastion of Sex Bias?. 10 NOVA L.J. 457 (1986) [hereinafter Erickson,
Legal Education]. For a summary of some of the study's findings and a discussion
of how to apply the methodology used in this study to other law courses, see
Erickson, Sex Bias in Law School Courses: Some Common Issues, 38 J. LEGAL EDUC.
101 (1988) [hereinafter Erickson, Sex Bias].
* Attorney and writer, Brooklyn, New York, specializing in family law; formerly
Richard J. Hughes Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law, Seton Hall University
School of Law (1986-87) and Professor, Ohio State University College of Law
(1980-1986). A.B., Vassar College, 1967; J.D., Brooklyn Law School, 1973; LL.M.,
Yale Law School, 1979. All views expressed herein are hers and do not represent the
position of any organization with which she is affiliated.
** Professor of Sociology, University of Nebraska at Omaha. A.B., Washington
University (St. Louis), 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1964;
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1977.

What Is HeinOnline?

With comprehensive coverage of government documents and more than 2,400 journals from inception on hundreds of subjects such as political science, criminal justice, and human rights, HeinOnline is an affordable option for colleges and universities. Documents have the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?