26 U. Fla. J.L. & Pub. Pol'y 451 (2015)
Ain't Too Proud to Beg - Anti-Begging Laws' First Amendment Problem

handle is hein.journals/ufpp26 and id is 469 raw text is: 

                               NOTE

AIN'T   TOO  PROUD TO BEG?* ANTI-BEGGING LAWS' FIRST
                   AMENDMENT PROBLEM


                         John  W. Fraser



INTRODUCTION        .......................................... ........452

I.   AN  OVERVIEW  OF DIFFERENT  STATE AND MUNICIPALITY
     APPROACHES   TO ANTI-BEGGING  LAWS............      ........454
     A.  Highly Restrictive Anti-Begging Laws....          ........... 455
         1. Michigan's Unconstitutional Anti-Begging Statute.......456
         2. Montpelier, Vermont's Anti-Begging Ordinance..........456
     B.  Less Restrictive Anti-Begging Laws..................  457
         1. New  York's Anti-Begging Regulation ......         ......457
         2. Fort Lauderdale, Florida's Anti-Begging Ordinance.....458
         3. Los Angeles, California and Chicago, Illinois's
            Anti-Begging Ordinances    ...............     ......458

II.  PROBLEMS   ADDRESSED  BY  ANTI-BEGGING  LAWS  AND
     THEIR  CONSEQUENCES       ............................ .......459
     A.  Problems Addressed by Anti-Begging Laws.....          ......459
     B.  What are the Consequences ofAnti-Begging Laws?  ........... 462

III. SUPREME  COURT  DECISIONS  ON WHETHER
     SOLICITATION  BY AN INDIVIDUAL IS PROTECTED  SPEECH
     UNDER  THE FIRST AMENDMENT          ..........................465
     A.  Village of Schaumburg v. Citizens for a
         Better Environment..    ...........................   465
     B.  International Society for Krishna
         Consciousness, Inc. v. Lee........................ 467

IV.  CIRCUIT COURT  INTERPRETATIONS...........        ...............470

    *  THE TEMPTATIONS, Ain't Too Proud to Beg, on GETTN' READY (Motown 1966).
    ** Associate Attorney, White Law PLLC; J.D. 2015, Michigan State University College
of Law; B.S. 2011, Central Michigan University. I would like to thank Professor Mae Kuykendall
for her insight, time, and advice throughout the writing process. Her mentorship and input were
invaluable. Additionally, Natalie A. O'Keefe and Katherine E. Wendt deserve thanks for
improving this Note with their keen feedback and guidance. I would also like to thank Alexander
S. Rusek for suggesting the topic of this Note. Finally, my wife, Cheri, deserves special thanks
for her sacrifices and unending support.
                                 451

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