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41 UCLA L. Rev. 903 (1993-1994)
Federalism: Some Notes on a National Neurosis

handle is hein.journals/uclalr41 and id is 927 raw text is: FEDERALISM: SOME NOTES ON A NATIONAL NEUROSIS
Edward L. Rubin* & Malcolm Feeley*
INTRODUCTION    ................................................             903
I.  FEDERALISM AND DECENTRALIZATION      ............................ 910
A. The Difference Between Federalism and Decentralization ........... 910
B. Decentralization inFederalist Clothes: Public Participation, Citizen Choice,
State Competition and Experimentation ........................ 914
1.  Public  Participation  ...................................      915
2.  Citizen  Choice  .......................................        917
3.  State  Competition  ....................................         920
4.  Experimentation  ......................................          923
II. FEDERALISM AND THE DIFFUSION OF POWER ........................ 927
III. FEDERALISM AND COMMUNITY .................................. 936
CONCLUSION    ..................................................             951
INTRODUCTION
A mere six years after its brave declaration that it had sworn off feder-
alism for good,' the Supreme Court suffered a relapse. Gregory v. Ashcroft,2
* Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley.
** Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley.
This article, part of a larger project by the authors on American prison reform, was supported
by a grant from the Guggenheim Foundation. The authors are grateful to Stephen Ross, Kim
Scheppele, the participants in the Berkeley Seminar on Federalism and the participants in the
Berkeley Faculty Colloquium for their insightful comments, and to Daniel Krislov for his thoughtful
assistance on this project. A preliminary version appears in Malcolm Feeley & Edward L. Rubin,
Federal-State Relations and Prison Administration, in POWER DIVIDED 63 (Harry N. Scheiber &
Malcom Feeley eds., 1989).
1. See Garcia v. San Antonio Metro. Transit Auth., 469 U.S. 528 (1985); William Van
Alstyne, The Second Death of Federalism, 83 MICH. L. REV. 1709, 1721 (1985) (Garcia implies
that federalism questions in general ... are not for the Court, but fundamentally for Congress,
finally to determine.). But see Martha A. Field, Comment, Garcia v. San Antonio Metropolitan
Transit Authority: The Demise of a Misguided Doctrine, 99 HARV. L. REV. 84, 110-18 (1985)
(noting that the Court has indicated a continuing interest in states' rights issues).
2. 111 S. Ct. 2395 (1991). For general discussions of this case see Ann Althouse, Varia-
tions on a Theory of Normative Federalism: A Supreme Court Dialogue, 1993 DUKE L.J. 979,
1003-13; William N. Eskridge & Philip P. Frickey, Quasi-Constitutional Law: Clear Statement
Rules as Constitutional Lawmaking, 45 VAND. L. REV. 593, 623-45 (1992); Philip P. Frickey, Law-
net: The Case of the Missing (Tenth) Amendment, 75 MINN. L. REV. 755, 759-63 (1991); The Su-
preme Court, 1990 Term-Leading Cases, 105 HARV. L. REV. 177, 196-206 (1991).

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