11 U. C. Davis J. Int'l L. & Pol'y 171 (2004-2005)
Toward a Human Rights Approach to Armed Conflict: Iraq 2003

handle is hein.journals/ucdl11 and id is 183 raw text is: TOWARD A HUMAN RIGHTS APPROACH TO
ARMED CONFLICT: IRAQ 2003
Karima Bennoune*
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.     INTRO  DU  CTION  ............................................................................. 172
II.    THE  M  OVE  TO  IH L  ....................................................................... 175
A.   The Relevant Bodies of Law ................................................. 175
1.  A n  O verview  of IH L  ....................................................... 175
2. Human Rights Law in Brief ........................................... 177
B. IHL and Human Rights: Fraternity or Bifurcation? .......... 179
C.   The U.N. Approach to Law in War ..................................... 182
III.   THE LIMITATIONS OF THE IHL APPROACH AS SHOWN BY
THE  IRAQ  CONFLICT ..................................................................... 184
A .  Iraq  1990  ................................................................................. 184
B .  Iraq  2003  ................................................................................. 185
1.  Com  batant D eaths .......................................................... 186
2. Civilian Deaths and Injuries .......................................... 187
3. The Broad Human Impact of the Attacks on Iraq ...... 190
4. The Aftereffects on Soldiers .......................................... 193
5. Militarism and Human Rights ....................................... 194
IV. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AND THE
INVASION   OF  IRAQ  (2003) ............................................................ 196
A .  Introduction  ............................................................................ 196
B. Human Rights and IHL Redux ............................................ 196
C. Relevant Human Rights Standards and Their Realms of
* Assistant Professor, Rutgers University School of Law-Newark, and former
Amnesty International legal advisor. The author would like to thank Dean Stuart
Deutsch for generous financial support for this research. She would also like to salute
the fine research assistance of Jillie Richards, Michael Toya and Elizabeth Espert.
Additionally, she would like to thank Christine Chinkin, Claire Dickerson and
numerous members of the Rutgers-Newark law faculty for their thoughtful comments
on successive drafts of this article. Finally, she would like to acknowledge the useful
feedback received when this article was presented at the Pennsylvania State University-
Dickinson College of Law, the UC Davis Law School, the Agora on International
Humanitarian Law held at the founding meeting of the European Society of
International Law, and the George Washington University Law School International
Law Colloquium. As always, remaining shortcomings are the full responsibility of the
author.

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