39 Third Branch 1 (2007)

handle is hein.journals/thirdbran39 and id is 1 raw text is: THE
THIRD
2000 Year-End Report on
the Federal Judiciary
Between December 19 and January 8 there
are 32 college bowl Games-but only one
Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary.
I once asked my predecessor, Chief Justice
William H. Rehnquist, why he released this
annual report on the state of the federal courts
on New Year's Day. He explained that it was
difficult to get people to focus on the needs of
the Judiciary and January 1 was historically a
slow news day-a day on which the concerns
of the courts just might get noticed.
This is my second annual report on the
Judiciary, and in it I am going to discuss
only one issue-in an effort to increase even
more the chances that people will take notice.
That is important because the issue has been
ignored far too long and has now reached the
level of a constitutional crisis that threatens to
undermine the strength and independence of
the federal Judiciary.
I am talking about the failure to raise judi-
cial pay. This is usually the point at which
many will put down the annual report and
return to the Rose Bowl, but bear with me long
enough to consider just three very revealing
charts prepared by the Administrative Office
of the United States Courts. The first shows  Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr.
that, in 1969, federal district judges made 21
percent more than the dean at a top law school
and 43 percent more than its senior law
professors.

Newsletter
of the
Federal
Courts
Vol. 39
Number I
January 2007

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