24 Third Branch 1 (1992)

handle is hein.journals/thirdbran24 and id is 1 raw text is: TfrJ-

BRANCH

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Vol. 24
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Chief Justice's 1991 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary

1991 marked the end of my fifth
year as Chief Justice. During that
time, I have had an opportunity to
become better acquainted with many
of the leaders of the Executive and
Legislative Branches,
as well as with many
of the men and
women who make
up the Judicial
Branch. I certainly
have an enhanced
appreciation for
these people and tile
tasks they face.
The past year
again challenged the
judiciary's ability to
continue delivering
the high quality of
justice the nation has
come to expect. The
overall business of
the federal courts
continued to in-
crease, although not at the same pace
as previous years. Total caseloads
climbed, along with appellate and
bankruptcy filings, but criminal and
civil filings in the district courts fell
slightly. The dedicated men and
women of the Judicial Branch worked

harder, innovated more, and man-
aged with greater efficiency, yet still
found themselves faced with more
demanding and more complex tasks.
1992 promises more of the same.

THE PAST AND FUTURE
In 1991, the nation celebrated the
Bicentennial of the Bill of Rights. The
federal judiciary used the occasion to
consider the historical currents that
shaped the first 10 amendments to

tile Constitution and to analyze tile
future implications of these amend-
ments. Various federal courts held
ceremonies and symposiums, and
the September 1991 meeting of the Ju-
dicial Conference
was dedicated to
the Bicentennial of
the Bill of Rights.
ed men and       The centerpiece of
e Judicial       the federal judi-
ed harder,      ciary's observance
ore, and         was a three day
qh greater       conference in Oc-
t gter found   tober, sponsored
t still found  by the Judicial
ced with         Conference Com-
ding and         mittee on the Bi-
x tasks,         centennial of the
es more of       Constitution. The
conference was
held in Williams-
burg, Virginia, in
conjunction with
the College of Wil-
liam and Mary's Marshall-Wythe
College of Law and its Institute of Bill
of Rights Law.
Judges, government officials, prac-
ticing attorneys, journalists and pro-
fessors of law, history and political
science constituted an extended fac-
ulty that presented major lectures,
moot court arguments, and sTall
group discussions. Topics ranged

See Year-End Report, page 2

The dedicat
women of th
Branch work
innovated m.
managed wit
efficiency, ye
themselves fd
more deman
more comple
1992 promise
the same.

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