About | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline

24 Brief [i] (1994-1995)

handle is hein.journals/tbrief24 and id is 1 raw text is: Hugh E. Reynolds Jr.

THE VIEW FROM THE CHAIR

My association with TIPS goes back
at least thirty years. I can testify to that
because there is a picture of the Fidel-
ity and Surety Committee's annual
meeting in New York in January 1963,
and I'm in it. For so many of the years
that I was active on the Fidelity and
Surety Committee, I knew little and
cared less about what TIPS was doing.
Gradually, however, I came to realize
the importance of TIPS to my practice
and to other attorneys who do what I
do.
For six years, I have worked in the
leadership of TIPS: first as a Council
Member, then as Section Vice-Chair,
then as Chair-Elect. I come to the
Chair believing that I know what most
of our members do in their day-to-day
activities because I have done the
same things myself for over forty
years. I also think I know what it takes
to run a TIPS committee because I
have done that, too. But when the
reins of TIPS were handed to me, I
came to the realization that I may
know a great deal, but how much I
really understand is another matter.
Moreover, I have asked myself, how
much more is there to learn?
There is a temptation to adopt all of
the past procedures and activities and
to employ the same people who im-
plemented those procedures and ac-
tivities. In that way it might be possi-
ble to make improvements, or so one
believes. This is a difficult temptation
to resist, considering the problems
that have occupied the leadership of
TIPS in recent years, including finan-
cial restrictions, static membership
numbers, difficulty in programming
(arising partly from the protracted di-
alogue as to whether the ABA's pro-
fessional education department
would merge with the American Law
Institute), and difficulties in determin-
ing how to expand the membership
and the leadership role of underrepre-
sented groups in TIPS whose practices

make them a logical part of the TIPS
family.
Of course, these problems must be
seen as opportunities. Financial re-
strictions cause you to look much
more carefully at what you do with
your money. Trying to devise a better
way to provide publications and CLE
programming forces you to concen-
trate on a reasonable cost-benefit anal-
ysis. You would especially try to re-
duce the cost to TIPS members who
wish to take advantage of these op-
portunities.
Recognizing that membership num-
bers are static forces you to examine
what you are doing to better serve
your members so this trend does not
continue. Attempting to provide for
greater participation by groups such
as solo practitioners causes you to ex-
amine how you can best serve those
groups. In the process, you meet new
friends with new ideas.
TIPS leadership has done much to
understand these problems and to im-
prove operations to better serve our
members. The Finance Committee has
restrained our expenditures so as to
concentrate our efforts on those as-
pects of TIPS's operations that are
most important to our membership,
such as publications and educational
programs. The TIPS Solo and Small
Firm Practitioners Task Force has been
installed as a Special Standing Com-
mittee. Under the dynamic leadership
of John Beyer, the group is working
to make TIPS more interesting and
more accessible to solo and small firm
practitioners. TIPS is a natural home
for all of these individuals who, as
part of their practice, handle cases in
the tort, insurance, and related fields.
As members of TIPS, you should be
aware of these practical problems that
the leadership must face. How tempt-
ing it would be simply to work on
these same problems! One could strive
for improvement and consider this an

adequate effort from the Chair. Of
course, I do intend to work on these
problems. The leadership of TIPS in-
tends to work on these problems. To
a large measure, each of you can help
resolve these problems so that we are
able to provide the best publications
and more quality legal education pro-
grams.
It is, however, very important that
the incoming TIPS leadership stand
back and ask, Can we do more? For
example, we need to devise a way to
give those members of the TIPS family
who want to get together with their
fellow TIPS members from through-
out the country more opportunities to
do so. The Annual Meeting simply
doesn't provide enough opportunity
for such collegiality.
TIPS has tried to use the Spring
Meeting as a combined business meet-
ing for the leadership and CLE pro-
gram for members on the theory that
this would foster such collegiality.
This dual-purpose meeting has been
going on now for almost ten years, but
frankly, it hasn't worked as planned.
The numbers of attendees at the
Spring CLE program have been rela-
tively small. The fact that the program
goes on in conjunction with the busi-
ness meeting means that the time re-
quired for both lengthens.
The most important cost factor for
any lawyer attending a meeting or a
program is time out of the office. It is
our responsibility when offering such
programs to schedule them to mini-
mize the time out of the office and
maximize savings. We also have
heard constantly from members that
we must attempt to organize functions
where the hotel and meal costs are
manageable.
While we wrestle with resolving
these problems, the reality of past
Spring Meetings has compelled me to
decide that there will be no formal
CLE program at the 1995 Spring Meet-
ing. I am hopeful, however, that at the
1995 Midwinter Meeting and the
Spring Meeting, a large number of
(Continued on page 38)

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 3,000 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Contact us for annual subscription options:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?

profiles profiles most