11 Stan. J. C.R. & C.L. 207 (2015)
Access to Justice for Immigrant Families and Communities: A Study of Legal Representation of Detained Immigrants in Northern California

handle is hein.journals/stjcrcl11 and id is 219 raw text is: ACCESS TO JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANT
FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES: A STUDY
OF LEGAL REPRESENTATION OF
DETAINED IMMIGRANTS IN NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA
Jayashri Srikantiah, David Hausman
& Lisa Weissman-Ward*
The recent influx of refugee families migrating to the United States has cast
a spotlight on the broken immigration system. Under current U.S. immigration
laws and policies, immigrants in Northern California and across the country are
not entitled to a lawyer unless they can pay for one or find someone to represent
them for free. This Article focuses on the Northern California immigrants who
*Jayashri Srikantiah is Professor of Law and Director, Immigrants' Rights Clinic at Stanford Law
School. David Hausman is a J.D./Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford Law School and Stanford Department
of Political Science. Lisa Weissman-Ward is Clinical Supervising Attorney and Lecturer in Law at
Stanford Law School. The authors would like to thank students Natalia Renta, Alfredo
Montelongo, and Kara McBride of the Stanford Law School Immigrants' Rights Clinic, who
contributed substantial work on the survey portion of this Article. The authors would also
like to thank the members of the Northern California Collaborative for Immigrant Justice, on
whose behalf a substantially identical version of this Article was released as a Report. We
are grateful to the Collaborative's advisory board members for their feedback on the Report.
The advisory board includes: Assistant Chief Immigration Judge Print Maggard, San
Francisco Immigration Court; Christina H. Lee, Becker & Lee LLP (EOIR co-liaison to the
San Francisco Immigration Court for the American Immigration Lawyers Association);
Meredith Linsky, Director, American Bar Association Commission on Immigration; Jack W.
Londen, Partner, Morrison & Foerster; Zachary M. Nightingale, Partner, Van der Hout,
Brigagliano & Nightingale; Luis J. Rodriguez, President, State Bar of California; and Jon B.
Streeter, Partner, Keker & Van Nest. We thank the Katzmann Study Group, which
conducted key research in New York about the effect of counsel in removal proceedings, for
providing the inspiration for this Article and the Report on which it is based. Many members
of that study group-including Peter Markowitz, Veyom Bahl, Nisha Agarwal, Stacey
Strongarone, and Oren Root-have provided helpful advice and guidance in the drafting of
the Report on which this Article is based. We also gratefully acknowledge Immigration
Judge Dana Marks, President of the National Association of Immigration Judges, who served
as a resource regarding information about the impact of unrepresented cases on the
immigration court system. This Article, and any errors, are solely the work of the authors.

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