56 Stan. L. Rev. 1271 (2003-2004)
The Social and Moral Cost of Mass Incarceration in African American Communities

handle is hein.journals/stflr56 and id is 1285 raw text is: THE SOCIAL AND MORAL COST OF MASS
INCARCERATION IN AFRICAN AMERICAN
COMMUNITIES
Dorothy E. Roberts*
INTRODUCTION: REFRAMING THE ISSUE OF RACE AND IMPRISONMENT .............. 1272
A. The Distinctive Features of African American Mass Incarceration .......... 1274
1. Total numbers  incarcerated  ................................................................... 1274
2. Rate  of   incarceration .............................................................................. 1274
3. The spatial concentration of incarceration ............................................ 1275
B. The New Direction of Prison Research ...................................................... 1276
1. Assessing the harm of mass incarceration v. identifying the cause of racial
disp arities  ...................................................................................................  1277
2. Community v. individual as the focus of research .................................. 1279
I. THEORIES OF COMM    UNITY  HARM  .................................................................... 1281
A. Mass Imprisonment Damages Social Networks ......................................... 1281
B. Mass Imprisonment Distorts Social Norms ............................................... 1285
C. Mass Imprisonment Destroys Social Citizenship ....................................... 1291
1. Felon  disenfranchisem ent ....................................................................... 1291
2. Labor  m arket exclusion .......................................................................... 1293
3.  C ivic  isolation  .........................................................................................  1294
II. THE MORAL SIGNIFICANCE OF COMMUNITY HARM ....................................... 1297
A. Moving Beyond the Prison-Crime Nexus ................................................... 1297
B. Mass Imprisonment and Political Subordination ...................................... 1298
C. Rethinking the Justifications for Punishment ............................................. 1300
C O N CLU SIO N  .......................................................................................................  1304
* Kirkland and Ellis Professor, Northwestern University School of Law; faculty
fellow, Institute for Policy Research. Matthew Lyon provided excellent research assistance
for this Article. I presented a draft of this Article at workshops at the Institute for Policy
Research and Florida State University College of Law and am grateful to participants for
their comments. I also thank participants in the Stanford Law Review Symposium on
Punishment and Its Purposes, especially my copanelists Paul Butler and Pamela Karlan, for
their insights.

1271

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 2,700 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Access to this content requires a subscription. Please visit the following page to request a quote or trial:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?