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49 New Eng. L. Rev. On Remand 1 (2014-2015)

handle is hein.journals/remand49 and id is 1 raw text is: 








                        Game of Spies


SPIES, PATRIOTS,   AND  TRAITORS:   AMERICAN INTELLIGENCE IN THE
REVOLUTIONARY WAR. By Kenneth A. Daigler. Washington,
D.C.: Georgetown University Press. 2014. Pp xviii, 317. $29.95.





                         LAWRENCE   FRIEDMAN*

Intelligence   gathering and analysis have long played  a critical role in
   national security efforts. Historically, and with good reason, the extent,
   reach,  and  effect of intelligence activities have remained  in the
shadows,  escaping  the notice of many  in government,   as well as the
attention of the American public. In the age of the twenty-four hour news
cycle, though, this situation is beginning to change: rare since Edward
Snowden's  revelations about what our intelligence services have been up
to, both domestically  and abroad,  has been  the week  in which  some
intelligence-related activity has not made headlines.'
    In light of the Snowden revelations   and  other  reports about the
intelligence activities in which the United States is engaged, some historical
context may  be  useful-both  to assuage  our fears and to manage   our
expectations.2 For every generation mistakenly supposes that the startling
events of its time are the worst ever to have occurred, only to be confronted
with  historical antecedents that give us some  perspective on  modern
events and offer lessons that may help us address their consequences.
    How  far back to go? In Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence
in the Revolutionary War,' Kenneth A. Daigler, a former Central Intelligence
Agency  operations officer, goes back to the earliest days of the republic.


  * Professor of Law, New England Law I Boston.
    At this writing, for example, the most recently-reported revelation concerns the Central
Intelligence Agency's improper searches of computer files maintained by the Senate's
Intelligence Committee. See Carl Hulse & Mark Mazzetti, Obama Expresses Confidence in C.I.A.
Director, N.Y. TIMES, Aug. 2, 2014, at A13.
    We use history to understand ourselves, and we ought to use it to understand others.
MARGARET MACMILLAN, DANGEROUS GAMES: THE USES AND ABUSES OF HISTORY ix-x (2009).
    KENNETH A. DAIGLER, SPIES, PATRIOTS, AND TRAITORS: AMERICAN INTELLIGENCE IN THE
REVOLUTIONARY WAR (2014).


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