7 Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Q. 1 (1978)

handle is hein.journals/npvolsq7 and id is 1 raw text is: 






JOURNAL OF VOLUNTARY ACTION RESEARCH/1


                              JOURNAL  OF VOLUNTARY ACTION RESEARCH
                Volume  7, Numbers 1-2, Winter-Spring Issues, January/April, 1978



ABSTRACTS OF ARTICLES APPEARING IN THIS  ISSUE:


VOLUNTARY ACTION AND PUBLIC SERVICES

Richard C. Rich
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and  State University

     Citizen participation in service  delivery can be an important part of the process of self-
government.  This potential can be  realized, however, only if we can identify barriers to
effective citizen involvement in service  delivery, and design institutions and policies that
will encourage sustained and fruitful  citizen participation in the processes by which public
services are shaped.  Theoretical  understanding is the first step in this identification.  This
paper develops a theoretical framework  for analysis of voluntarily organized citizen participa-
tion in urban service delivery systems.   It proceeds from a discussion of the nature of neigh-
borhood associations, to an examination  of the major roles such organizations play in service
delivery, and concludes with an exploration  of the relationship among public policy, the
institutional design of service delivery  arrangements, and citizen's opportunities for effective
participation in public service provision.   The primary focus is on assessing the potential
influence over services which each  role offers citizens, and identifying government policies and
structures which make each strategy most  effective.


CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN POLICING:  THE  SOCIAL CONTROL OF A SOCIAL CONTROL AGENCY

Georgette Bennett-Sandler
NBC News

     Police agencies are the prototype  for formal social control mechanisms. However,  their
social control role is complicated by  the fact that their mandate comes from the very consti-
tuents they are charged with controlling.   The impetus of the maximum feasible participation
written into the 1964 anti-poverty  legislation, has produced various attempts to reconcile this
paradox.  This paper examines various  forms of citizen participation in policing; dilemmas of
implementing such efforts; and community  organizing lessons learned from the War-on Poverty.
These issues combined with national  developments and trends are used in developing proposals
for successful programs for citizen participation  in policing.


SOURCES OF THE COMMUNITY CONTROL  OVER POLICE MOVEMENT

Rita Mae Kelly
Rutgers University

     This paper uses nonequivalent  control group design and analysis of variance to assess the
relative impacts of the following  social forces on the propensity of citizens to advocate
community control over police:   (1) neighborhood organized political activity; (2) the degree
of perceived physical safety deprivation;  (3) the degree of discrepancy perceived between
current safety level compared to that  of two years earlier; and (4) the degree to which a
discrepancy is seen between the respondents'  own general safety compared to that perceived
to be available in other neighborhoods within  the same city.  The impact of sex, race, age,
education, and income are assessed as  is their individual relative importance.  The findings
from a study of a Washington, D.C. experiment  provide insights regarding the role of neigh-
borhood organizations in mediating the  effects of safety deprivation and citizen dissatisfaction
with police services as well as illuminate  the sources of the community control over police
movement.

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