14 Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Q. 3 (1985)

handle is hein.journals/npvolsq14 and id is 1 raw text is: 


















                     EDITOR'S COMMENTS



  This issue of IVAR ranges widely over a set of pressing policy issues in volun-
tary action research, and demonstrates a wide geographic base in its field set-
tings.
  Jeffrey S. Slovak and Walter Lucas, in their lead article Voluntary Action for
Community   Economic Development: The Case of BREP in New Jersey, analyze
carefully and closely the development of a voluntary partnership of business and
government.  Their study not only teaches us much about the much heralded
new  partnerships, but provides a model of clarity and elegance in its method-
ology.
  Another  important policy issue is explored by Patricia Baron Pollak in her
paper, Does Citizen Participation Matter?: Toward the Development of The-
ory. In this paper, Prof. Pollak describes a method for assessing the impact of a
citizens' organization on a policy decision, a matter much speculated on in the
literature but rarely assessed with empirical rigor.
  We  move  from the politics of the Northeastern United States to the sunny
climes of Trinidad and Tobago for the next paper. Here, economist L.P. Fletcher
charts the decline of friendly societies, multi-purpose voluntary mutual aid
organizations, over the past quarter-century. He attributes much of this decline
to limitations of management, internal and external.
  Finally, we present the first of what we hope will become a regular JVAR fea-
ture, a symposium  of opinion and comment. Richard D. Logan  provides the
counterpoint with his essay, Youth Volunteerism and Instrumentality. Under
the leadership of Associate Editor Virginia Parkum, a lively and instructive set of
comments  frame  the issue and advance our understanding of an important
problem.
  Another long-awaited innovation surrounds this issue: it is fully typeset! At
long last, JVAR has entered the big leagues of journal formatting. Our apprecia-
tion to Rutgers University for the support that permits this giant step.
  The next issue will present papers from the 1984 AVAS Conference, the very
best of the 52 papers presented at that stimulating gathering. Do let us know
how  you like the new format, and keep those submissions coming.


Ton Van Til

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