76 Minn. L. Rev. 193 (1991-1992)
The Influence of Legal Education on Moral Reasoning

handle is hein.journals/mnlr76 and id is 209 raw text is: The Influence of Legal Education
on Moral Reasoning
Sandra JanofE*
INTRODUCTION
Male educators developed traditional legal education for
male students. Law school student populations, however, are
no longer exclusively, or even predominantly, male. Today,
42.5% of law students are women.' While feminist scholars call
for the inclusion of a woman's perspective in rethinking legal
education,2 very few studies have, to date, explored legal educa-
* Psychologist. Ph.D., Temple University. I thank Dean Robert Rein-
stein of the Temple-University School of Law for supporting this research and
Professor Robert Bartow for structuring the data collection-no easy task. I
thank the Temple School of Law faculty and staff for graciously providing in-
formation and access to students, and for shedding light on the law school ex-
perience for an outsider. I especially thank Professor Jane Baron for
providing a route into feminist jurisprudential literature, and Professor Peter
Severeid for giving me an important historical and cultural perspective on law.
I thank my dissertation chair, Dr. Susan Wheelan, for her scholarly guidance
and support throughout this research. I am indebted to Professors Marina An-
gel and Richard Greenstein for their sustained interest, commitment, and
work on this research. In addition, I want to thank Richard Greenstein for the
many fulfilling and fruitful discussions about legal thinking, feminist jurispru-
dence, and developmental psychology. Thank you to Annie Rogers and Dana
Jack for their help and to Carol Gilligan for her invaluable contribution. A
special thank you goes to my wonderful family and friends. Finally, to the stu-
dents of the Class of 1992 of Temple Law School, especially those who were
interviewed and gave their time, thoughts, and feelings willingly and gener-
ously, I offer deepest thanks and wish you all well.
1. AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION SECTION OF LEGAL EDUCATION AND AD-
MISSIONS TO THE BAR, A REvIEw OF LEGAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES:
FALL, 1990, LAw SCHOOLS AND BAR ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 66 (1990) [here-
inafter REVIEW OF LEGAL EDUCATION]. Of the 127,261 students in law schools
across the nation in the 1990-91 academic year, 54,097, or 42.5%, were women.
Id This is a slight decrease from the 1989-90 academic year, the year of this
study, in which 42.7% of all law students were women. Id At Temple Univer-
sity School of Law, the population for this study, 46.8% of the students were
women. Data on file with the Temple University School of Law Office of Aca-
demic Affairs, Development, & Planning.
2. See generally 38 J. LEGAL EDUC. 1-183 (1988) (issue dedicated to Wo-
men in Legal Education-Pedagogy, Law, Theory, and Practice). In particu-
lar, for a listing of representative feminist writings, see Carrie Menkel-

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