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10 Law Notes Gen. Prac. [i] (1974)

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                       LAW NOTES



                       for the General Practitioner


Published by the American Bar Association's Section of General Practice


Vol. 10, No.1


February, 1974


             EDITOR'S VIEWPOINT
  In our last issue, I commented in this column upon the
legal profession's image in the eyes of our youth. I
concluded my observations as follows: In the final anal-
                    ysis, it is a satisfying way to spend
                    a life! A recently released Gallup
                    survey indicates that our profes-
                    sion as a career remains more
                    popular than we might have sup-
                    posed, particularly among young
                    adults.
                      While medicine remains the top
                    choice among all adults as the best
                    profession for a young man (28
                    percent), a   law  career  rates
   Bruce E. Davis   second, favored by 14 percent. A
decade ago, in 1962, only 6 percent chose law.
  Among adults under 30 years of age who are presently
deciding on careers, the trend in favor of the legal
profession is even more marked. In 1962, 8 percent
chose law as the best career. That figure in the latest
Gallup survey rose to 20 percent, right behind medicine.
  The survey involved 1,576 adults, 18 and older,
interviewed in more than 300 specially selected localities
across the nation during the period Oct. 6-8, 1973.
  The survey asked the public to rate the suitability of
nine leading professions for a young man just starting his
career. Each person was handed a card listing the
professions and asked this question: Suppose a young
man came to you and asked your opinion about taking
up a profession. Assuming that he was qualified to enter
any of these professions, which one of them would you
first recommend to him?
  The following table compares the latest choices of the
American public (18 and older) with those recorded in
surveys taken on four earlier occasions during the last 23
years:
            PREFERRED OCCUPATIONS


Doctor
Lawyer
Engineer-Builder
Professor-Teacher
Business Exec.
Dentist
Clergyman
Gov't Career
Banker
Other, None,
Don't Know


1973 196'
28% 29S
14     8
13    14
10    12
10     7
  7    4
  7    8
  5    7
  2    1


1962
23%
  6
  18
  12
  5
  4
  8
  7
  2


1950
29%
  8
  16
  5
  8
  4
  8
  6
  4


4   10    15   15    12


  The following table shows the latest choices of adults
under 30 years of age compared with those recorded a
decade ago, in 1962:
           PREFERRED OCCUPATIONS
             Views of Under-30 Group


Doctor
Lawyer
Engineer-Builder
Professor-Teacher
Business Executive
Dentist
Government Career
Banker
Clergyman


Latest
25%
20
14
14
  9
  6


1962
26%
  8
  17
  18
  3
  5
  7
  2
  4


      SECTION MEMBERSHIP CONTINUES
        TO SHOW IMPRESSIVE GROWTH

  If one were to review our column during the past ten
years - the life span of Law Notes a comment might
be made    He certainly is concerned about Section
membership numbers! I agree. However, I am not con-
cerned about Section membership growth merely because
of a hypnotic hang-up on bigness. Rather, a continued
growth of our Section suggests that our publications,
including Law Notes and Docket Call, must be meeting
our objectives, e.g., to provide articles of practical and
immediate assistance to the general practitioner.
  It is therefore pleasing to report the latest membership
statistics for our Section, based upon September num-
bers for each year:


1965 -3,489
1966- 5,912
1967 - 7,139
1968 - 8,922


1969
1970
1971 -
1972


9,083
9,069
9,960
10,581


                   1973   12,333
To paraphrase John Henry Cardinal Newman: Growth
of the Section is evidence of life.

            WHY JUSTICE FAILS
  During the past two years, I have editorialized on some
of the problems related to our system of justice. In some
instances, I have suggested our system might better be
characterized as one of injustice. I have commented on
delays in arraignment, treatment of youthful offenders,
drug sentencing - questioning whether our present prac-
tices, procedures, laws might be greatly improved.


20 Pages

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