8 ALSA F. 167 (1984)
Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Law

handle is hein.journals/lstf8 and id is 175 raw text is: ARTICLES
ORWELL'S NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR
AND LAW
by Rans ford C. Pyle
l),'partment of Pulic Serrice Affairt. U niterotr of Central Forida
papers, popular presentations and a variety of general
responses.  Certainly legal scholarship should not be
left off the bandwagon.   Nevertheless, 1984 may be
viewed at first blush to have a lot to do with politics,
almost nothing to do with law.   The book's protagonist,
Winston  Smith,  probably  Orwell's  oracular  alter  ego,
declares that his society  has no laws, and     American
practitioners are no doubt inclined to agree. To a lawyer,
the most notable feature of the regime of Oceania (1984's
huge nation headquartered in London) is its absence of
lawyers and courts - there is no legal profession as we
think of one.    I would like to focus in part on that
apparent gap in what otherwise would appear to be a
slightly grotesque forecast of selected features of socialist
society  and  politics.  I say   slightly  because  the
frighteningly grotesque vision it presented a third of a
centurv ago is mitigated by a partial fulfillment of the
prophetic message.

A LSA Forum

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