178 Law & Just. - Christian L. Rev. 37 (2017)
How the Reformation Shaped Ecclesiastical and Secular Law in Great Britain

handle is hein.journals/ljusclr178 and id is 41 raw text is: 




       HOW THE REFORMATION
 SHAPED ECCLESIASTICAL AND
       SECULAR LAW IN GREAT
                       BRITAIN

                    FRANK CRANMER





Abstract: The Reformation in England   unlike in Scotland was
primarily about governance rather than theology. Theological change
came after the death of Henry VIII. As a consequence, its impact on
Anglican church law was only gradual and by the time of the Act of
Uniformity the Church of England was an ecclesiastical hybrid, with
fairly Catholic liturgy alongside some rather Calvinist doctrinal
statements   and Western Canon law continued in force unless
consciously revoked, so the impact of the Reformation on Anglican
church law was not either as profound or as immediate as one might
imagine. Moreover because the church courts continued to have both
a civil and a quasi-criminal jurisdiction, the canon law had a
considerable influence on the development of secular law in both
jurisdictions: in England and Wales primarily through the doctrine of
equity and the continuation of ecclesiastical jurisdiction over matters
that are now dealt with by the secular courts and in Scotland as a
primary source of Roman law principles that influenced the
development of Scots law.
The English and Scots Reformations1
Like the other national Reformations, the English Reformation was not
an event but a process and a long-drawn-out one at that. Unlike the
Continental or Scottish Reformations, however, the English
Reformation was not predominantly about theology but largely about
power politics or, if you like, sovereignty. English churchmen were by
no means unaware of the theological ferments in Continental Europe
1 This paper was presented at the Kirchenrechtslehrertagung in Halle from 4-6
   May 2017, to which I was kindly invited by Prof Dr Hans Michael Heinig. It
   has been vastly improved by Norman Doe's comments on my draft and by
   discussions at the conference but any remaining infelicities are mine.

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