10 J. Int'l L & Int'l Rel. 4 (2014)
Toward Post-National Membership - Tensions and Transformation in German and EU Citizenship

handle is hein.journals/jilwirl10 and id is 12 raw text is: Toward Post-National Membership?
Tensions and Transformation in German and EU Citizenship
KIRAN BANERJEE
I.   INTRODUCTION          ................................................. 4
II.  GERMAN MEMBERSHIP REGIMES: A CRUCIAL CASE......           ................ 7
III. THEORIZING POST-NATIONALISM: CONCEPTS AND CLAIMS.......................... 9
IV. THE DIS-AGGREGATION OF CITIZENSHIP:
GERMANY'S MIGRANT POPULATIONS.....................................11
V.   GERMANY'S PERSISTING AMBIGUITIES OF BELONGING AND MEMBERSHIP ... 28
I.      INTRODUCTION
We are in a time of transition, or at least uncertainty, with regard to the
status and future of our contemporary conceptions of community,
membership, and belonging. The recent explosion of global discussions, both
scholarly and political, about immigration, multiculturalism, and the role of
universal human rights norms in constraining state action, are a testament to
the unsettled and contested nature of our traditional conceptual frameworks
in light of the rapid developments of the post-war era.
Very much at the intersection of such concerns has been the long-
running debate over post-national citizenship, which has focused on
perceived transformations in the meaning and significance of citizenship
rights and status in relation to nationality, the state and emerging
transnational forces. Beginning with Yasemin Soysal's influential and
provocative The Limits of Citizenship, proponents of the post-nationalist
position have argued that we have witnessed and are continuing witness to a
fundamental transformation in the nature of citizenship.' Pointing to a
Vanier Scholar and Doctoral Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.
I am grateful for input and comments from Joseph Carens, Randall Hansen, Willem Maas,
Anthony Mohen, and Phil Triadafilopoulos, as well from participants at the conferences where
this piece has been presented. The author also is thankful for the helpful suggestions of the JILIR
editorial team, as well as the Journal's anonymous reviews. Any remaining errors or omissions
remain my own. Date accepted with revisions: November 6, 2013.
1 See Linda Bosniak, The Citizen and the Alien: Dilemmas of Contemporary Membership (Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 2006); David Jacobson, Rights Across Borders: Immigration and the
Decline of Citizenship (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996); Saskia Sassen, Losing
Control? Sovereignty in an Age of Globalization (New York: Colombia University Press, 1996);
Saskia Sassen, Towards Post-National and Denationalized Citizenship in Engin F Isin & Bryan
S Turner eds, Handbook of Citizenship Studies (London: Sage, 2002); Saskia Sassen, Territory,
@ 2014 Journal of International Law and International Relations
Vol 10, pages 4-30. ISSN: 1712-2988.

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