2 PTC Newsl. 1 (1982-1983)

handle is hein.journals/iprolane2 and id is 1 raw text is: 



NOwSLOTT8eR

Published by the
Section of Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law
of the American Bar Association
Volume 2, Number 1, Fall 1982


Chairman's Letter
  Thanks to the imaginative ef-
forts of Greg Maier and his
Membership Committee, our
Section now has, for the first
time, over 6,000 members.
Considering the present eco-
nomic climate, in which other
professional organizations are
experiencing declines in mem-
bership, the continued growth
of ou Section is no small
achievement.
  I believe the growth in our membership is due to the in-
creased awareness, within the three areas of the law
served by our Section, that we function in a totally demo-
cratic manner. Unlike the other ABA sections, our total
membership is entitled to vote on every resolution. While
the other sections operate primarily through their Coun-
cils, our Section does not. Thus, when we submit a resolu-
tion to Congress, the PTO, other governmental agencies,
or to various legal organizations, they know that it has
been approved by the majority of our members who con-
sidered the resolution during the business sessions of our
Section at the Annual Meeting. This truly unique distinc-
tion is one that our Section should be justly proud to pro-
claim to our profession.
  As many of you know, our Section is entitled to com-
municate its positions to Congress without going to the
ABA House of Delegates for an official ABA position if
we follow the established rules for obtaining what is
called blanket authority. In my first month as Chair-
man of the Section, I have had two occasions to follow
this procedure. On August 31, 1 wrote to express the Sec-
tion's opposition to any special exemption in the Copy-
right Law for public performances of copyrighted
literary or musical works by fraternal and veterans organ-
izations and specifically requested the Conference Com-
mittee to delete such special interest provisions, added by
the Senate, from H.R. 4441. On September 14, I in-
formed the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee, which was scheduled to hold hearings the following
day on S. 2428 (The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of
1982), of the resolution our Section approved at the An-


nual Meeting in August which favors, in principle,
federal legislation criminalizing certain use, with intent to
deceive, of federally registered marks, but expressing no
opinion on the specific provisions of S. 2428 since the bill
itself was not debated and approved at our Annual
Meeting.
  As you read this, I will be attending a portion of the
Third Session of the Diplomatic Conference for the Revi-
sion of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Indus-
trial Property as a part of the U.S. delegation, headed by
Commissioner Mossinghoff. The Conference will take
place in Geneva from October 4 through October 30. The
fundamental issues to be discussed at the Conference per-
tain to the possible detrimental consequences resulting
from the failure to work or insufficient working of
patented inventions in member countries (Article 5A) and
the possible restrictions in the future use of appellations
of origin and other geographical names to be claimed by
the developing countries. Considerable harm can occur if
the present drafts are approved, but the U.S. delegation,
with the help of other countries, is hopeful that a spirit of
cooperation and mutual respect for the differing needs of
                             (Continued on page 13)


Copyright © 1982 American Bar Association


Produced by the ABA Press

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