54 Int'l Soc. Work 3 (2011)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk54 and id is 1 raw text is: 



Editorial                                                      e

                                                       International Social Work
                                                               54(I) 3-6
Globalization: New                               R       The Author(s) 2011
                                                Reprints and permission: sagepub.
challenges and                                     . .... ,sPermissi ...
                                               DOI: 10. 1177/00208728103 92123
opportunities for                                      http://is.sagepub.com
social work                                                  OSAGE






Globalization has created new challenges and opportunities for social work
theory and practice that are explored by the authors in this issue. These
include culturally relevant forms of intervention, promoting indigenization
as a counter to imperialistic relationships through practice and responding
to social problems raised by the development of communities and the move-
ment of people seeking to escape poverty and hardship.
   Seonmi Kim raises concerns about the decline in the quality of day-care
provisions in South Korea as the government pursued a neo-liberal agenda
of allowing private providers to make money in this sector. Neo-liberalism
is presented as a negative effect of globalization because it prioritized prof-
its above children's needs. Consequently, the government's attempts to raise
the quality of the child-care services raise standards as anticipated despite
increased monitoring requirements and subsidies granted.
   Interactions between peoples and countries have been facilitated by
cheap modes of transportation and the internet and become key features of
globalization. Movements of peoples between and within countries have
increased awareness of diversity amongst populations that might inhabit a
particular territory and raised the significance of developing culturally sen-
sitive forms of practice. Ruby Chau, Sam Yu and Cam Tran compare two
approaches - the shared cultural knowledge (SCK) and diversity-based
(DB) approaches - to explore health and social care services delivered to
populations of Chinese descent in the UK. They conclude that DB is better
as a model for practitioners to adopt because it facilitates the provision of
more appropriate services.
   The theme of culturally relevant service provision is also explored by
David Rothwell, this time with regards to indigenous peoples from Hawai'i.
There is a political movement in these islands that wishes to assert its

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