47 Int'l Soc. Work 5 (2004)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk47 and id is 1 raw text is: 

International Social Work 47(1): 5-6p

Sage Publications: London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi
DOI: 10.1177/0020872804039403



Editorial




Over the last century social work has made a major contribution to
the development of skill and knowledge in the field of adoptions. It is
an area of knowledge in which social work is the leading profession
and in which it has been highly effective. Overall the research in
adoption demonstrates that for the most part adoptions are highly
successful.
  In recent years a particular pattern of adoptions has emerged,
one that is more than an interesting variation, since it touches on
thousands of children and families. This is international adoption.
Three of the articles in this issue are concerned with this topic.
That by  Scott Ryan and  Victor Groza is devoted entirely to the
topic of a specific area of international adoption, focusing on one
country. Two  of the others touch on important peripheral issues,
cross-culture and cross-racial families and reducing birth rates.
  The  article by Ryan and Groza  is important in several ways.
It demonstrates the richness of knowledge to be gleaned when care-
ful research is carried out. Thus we learn much about the efficacy of
adoptions in two different but similar situations: one in which the
children were placed with families in their own country and the
other where they were placed with families in a different country.
The  authors are to be commended   for the openness with which
they point out the  limitations of the study and the challenges
facing researchers wanting to pursue other components   of this
important contemporary  area, such as sampling, the use of trans-
lated instruments, interpreters and variations of cultures. Because
there are problems in this kind of research does not mean   we
should avoid it. Rather we should be encouraged to continue to
openly address these challenges and work on  refining technique,
strategy and sampling. These authors have focused on two countries
only, the United States and Romania. But they remind us that there
are other parts of the world  where similarly large numbers of
children are being adopted from one country by parents of another
country. These may  be  defined as cross-cultural and sometimes

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