43 Int'l Soc. Work 5 (2000)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk43 and id is 1 raw text is: 


International Social Work 43(1): 5-6


Sage Publications: London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi
0020-8728[200001]43:1;5-6; 010516



Editorial



As I began to gather my thoughts for the editorial I realized that
although I am typing it on my computer which is now working just
fine it will not be published until the new millennium, when all the
soothsayers of doom of Y2K have told us to expect dire happenings
related to our omnipresent technology. However I have seen the
page proofs of this issue and noted that they are dated with the year
2000. Thus I know that whatever else occurs at that much-talked of
stroke of midnight, our journal at least will be published and we will
begin our forty-third volume in a new century and new millennium.
It is unusual to interact with any of the media or any of our major
societal systems these days without some reference being made
about this moment  in history. It is clearly viewed as an event of
monumental   proportions by many.  Hence  sage reflections and
profound utterances are expected on all sides.
  But what of this for an editor of a journal such as ours? No such
pronouncements  come  to mind.  Rather, having just reread the
articles for this issue, and conscious of the cornucopia of articles
awaiting publication and in the process of review, I am aware of an
intense and sobering sense of gratitude and wonderment. Grati-
tude, that as a journal we are continuing to move forward and to
progress. We  are no longer new. We  have  crossed into a new
century. This requires an acceptance of our maturity. A journal that
has existed going on 50 years, about the international aspects of a
profession that has existed in three different centuries, must no
longer look on itself as new or developing. Wonderment, as I read
the range of articles we receive, at the intricacies of the complexity
of social issues facing us and the challenge of how best to use the
power and influence of a professional journal to expand our knowl-
edge and to increase our impact.
  The  articles selected for this issue seek to respond to this chal-
lenge. All  touch on  matters  related to world  perspectives,
educational challenges, and problems, and the need to expand our
horizons both in our teaching and our practice. Two, in particular,
touch on the growing importance and prevalence of inter-country

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