41 Int'l Soc. Work 5 (1998)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk41 and id is 1 raw text is: 




Editorial


I am writing this editorial having just come from a very moving
November  11 memorial service in the chapel of Renison College of
the University of Waterloo. This day in this part of the world is a
day of remembrance  for the servicemen who died in the two world
wars. Today's ceremony reminded us of the many others and many
ways  in which people  are the victims of war. These thoughts
reinforced the ideas which had been emerging for the content of
this editorial. I had been trying to relate my comments to the impact
of the dramatic and emotionally laden days surrounding the death
and burial of Mother Theresa and Diana, Princess of Wales. This
morning's ceremony  helped.
  Mother  Theresa has long been the champion and servant of the
poor, not only for those whom she touched directly but also for all
of the poor of the world. She has contributed greatly to a growing
awareness and  sensitivity of the universality of poverty and the
need to individualize each poor person in our universe. I have been
impressed with the numbers  of persons I know, not particularly
sensitive to poverty and its dimensions, who have altered their
views due to the influence of this nun.
  The  Princess in a different yet parallel way has done much to
bring an awareness to the long-forgotten and easily ignored horrific
products of modern warfare, the millions of left-behind landmines
in many parts of the world, mines which continue to kill and maim,
often as many, or more persons who died in the actual war.
  Both of these persons have brought a responsive focus to two of
our modern  world's humanitarian challenges; both essential to the
mission of social work.
  But what of this for International Social Work? We know all too
well that the regular publication of a professional journal such as
ours does not  have the emotional  worldwide all-encompassing
impact that did the life and death events of these two world figures.
Our academic  articles on the minutiae of the myriad of problems,
theories about them and solutions to them addressed in each issue
do not move  persons  or stir our commitments in similar ways.
Indeed the number of persons who read them is really very small.

International Social Work (SAGE, London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi)
Vol. 41, 5-6                        0020-8720[199801]41:1;5-6;003523

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