37 Int'l Soc. Work 5 (1994)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk37 and id is 1 raw text is: 





Editorial


Two  events in the last few days have led me to write a different kind of
Editorial for this issue of International Social Work. The first took place
at a meeting this week of the senior administrators of our University at
which the Chief Librarian warned us of the growing difficulty of maintain-
ing subscriptions to professional journals due to rising costs and diminish-
ing budgets. The second involved the receipt of a fax message from our
publisher, Sage, reminding me that once again we were late in submitting
complete material for the next issue and further, that the material we had
submitted for the current issue was incomplete. In all the years I have been
Editor, I don't think we have ever been able to adhere to the publisher's
schedule; this to my intense disappointment.
  In addition to the ongoing, friendly, collegial yet insistent urgings from
London  about  deadlines and incomplete material, there is another reality
in the process of getting our journal out on a regular basis. This involves
a continual influx of letters, phone calls and, with new technology, fax
messages from  colleagues who have submitted articles and are wondering
about their status in the reviewing process.
  As those of our readers who have submitted articles are aware, there are
inordinately long delays in the process of circulating and assessing them.
Although  we have made considerable progress in speeding up this process,
it is still too long. Such delays are understandably frustrating in the extreme
for those who have submitted their work in the hope that it will be published
in a timely manner. Indeed, one of the concerns of some authors is that
these delays result in material becoming outdated. In an interesting way, the
very success of the journal has made this even more challenging in that the
number  of articles and their geographic distribution has increased. This, in
turn, increases the administrative work involved, and slows down the selec-
tion process even further.
  Lest this be viewed as some form of public confession for which I am
seeking forgiveness, it is not! Nor is it to be viewed as a complaint. Rather,
it is to present to the various constituencies we serve the realities of main-
taining an international journal in these grim economic times, where there
is little support available to the editorial process. I was aware of this when
I became Editor, and have put a considerable amount of time into seeking
alternative sources of funding. I am extremely grateful to the University for
its support, and in particular, to the group of graduate and undergraduate

International Social Work (SAGE, London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi),
Vol. 37 (1994), 5-6.

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 2,700 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Access to this content requires a subscription. Please visit the following page to request a quote or trial:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?