22 Int'l Soc. Work 1 (1979)

handle is hein.journals/intsocwk22 and id is 1 raw text is: 



















EDITORIAL


T HIS issue may well be called the East-
       West  issue because the topics covered
       deal with problems  and  developments
 specific to regions in the East and West. At
 the same   time  several papers  afford  an
 opportunity to the reader to reflect on the
 transferability of knowledge  and   practice
 from one  region to the other.

   Kendall's paper  dwells on  the  problems
 of consultation by western educators in Asia
 and  spells out  a  number  of  approaches
 which will bid fair to make for effectiveness
 and to  enhance  reciprocity.

   Gokhale  and  Sohoni,  in a  paper which
 roams  widely in  the western  and  eastern
 world examine   and  suggest  possible new
 directions for corrections. They end   their
 paper with a set of specific recommendations
 at the legislative, judicial, educational and
 administrative realms, and make explicit the
 philosophy which underlies their recommenda-
 tions.

   Roskin's  paper   deals  with  evaluative
research, an  area  of  considerable interest
and  import in  the United States and  other
parts of the West. Because of the universality
of the problem  which  he addresses Roskin's
suggestions for collaboration between social
work  researcher, administrator and   practi-
tioner will be found useful in many ports of
the eastern world as well.
  The  same can be  said of Haliachmi's paper
which  deals with 'On   the Job Training of
Social Workers.  While the specific technical


approaches   the  paper  suggestes, probably
are  not readily transferable, the ideas and
principles these approaches  reflect certainly
would   seem to  be pertinent to social work
endeavors   in any part  of the world  where
ongoing   development  and   updating  know-
ledge  and  skill are viewed as indispensible
means   for continued  professional effective-
ness.
   Fadayomi's  paper  focuses  on a  specific
situation in Nigeria; namely, preschool care
for  children of working  mothers. The  pro-
blems  of resource  adequacy  and  of family
cohesion  in the face of changes in economic
development   would  seem  to  exist also in
those parts of Africa where  changing  social
and  economic  conditions call for an exami-
nation of  the appropriateness of current or
past child care practices.

   Lee's paper addresses  single parenthood,
a  phenomenon   which has  begun  to appear
in any western  industrialized society. There-
fore his focus on procedures  for identifying
single parent families is worthy of considera-
tion if we  are to  be able  to comprehend
and  deal with the social and  economic  as-
pects of this phenomenon.
  Taken  as a whole  the papers in this issue
contain food for thought, specific information
and  material pertinent to problems and deve-
lopments which  have a way  of moving  from
one  part of the world to another.

                     Werner  W.  Boehm
                     Editor-in-Chief

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