42 Int'l Migration Rev. 3 (2008)

handle is hein.journals/imgratv42 and id is 1 raw text is: 






Between Hereand There: Immigrant

Cross-Border Activities and Loyalties

Roger Waldinger
Department of Sociology, UCLA

    This paper  provides an empirical assessment of the prevalence and
    determinants of cross-state social exchanges and attachments among
    Latin American  immigrants  living in the United States. As we shall
    show, using data from a recent survey of Latin American migrants living
    in the United States, migrant cross-state social action comes in a variety of
    types, with the direction of conditioning factors differing from one
    type to  another. Moreover, social and political incorporation in the
    United States reduces affective ties and provision of material support,
    all the while facilitating other forms of cross-state social action. Con-
    sequently, while international migrants regularly engage in trans-state
    social action, the paper shows that neither transnationalism as condition
    of being, nor transmigrants, as distinctive class of people, is commonly
    found.




At the turn of the 21st century, globalization is the order of the day. With
international migration bringing the alien other from third world to first, and
worldwide trade and communications  amplifying the feedbacks traveling in
the opposite direction, the view that nation-state and society normally
converge has waned. Instead, social scientists are looking for new ways to think
about the connections between here and there, as evidenced by the interest
in the many   things called transnational. Those studying international
migration evince particular excitement. Observing that migration produces a
plethora of connections spanning home and host societies, these scholars
proclaim the emergence of transnational communities (see Glick Schiller
et al., 1992; Smith and Guarnizo, 1998; Portes et al., 1999; Levitt, DeWind,
and Vertovec, 2003; and  accompanying  articles in International Miration
Review 37(3)).
     This paper  casts a skeptical view on this new scholarly consensus.
Agreeing that international migrants regularly engage in trans-state social
action, the paper contends that neither transnationalism as condition of being,
nor transmigrants, as distinctive class of people, is commonly found. As we shall
show, using data from a recent survey of Latin American migrants living in the

 2008 by the Center for Migration Studies of New York. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-7379.2007.00112.x


IMR Volume 42 Number  1 (Spring 2008):3-29


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