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104 Nw. U. L. Rev. 1441 (2010)
A Psychology of Intellectual Property

handle is hein.journals/illlr104 and id is 1449 raw text is: Copyright 2010 by Northwestern University School of Law                      Printed in U.S.A.
Northwestern University Law Review                                            Vol. 104, No. 4
A PSYCHOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
Jeanne C. Fromer*
IN TRO D U CTION ...........................................................................................................  144 1
I.   PROTECTABILITY........................................................ 1445
A.   Patent Law            .....................................     ...... 1446
B.   Copyright Law ..........................                    ............... 1449
C.   Explaining the Diferences    ...................................... 1453
II.  CREATIVITY        .................. ....... ................ ................................... 1456
A.   Why the Creative Process Matters.....           ......................1 457
B.   The Psychology of Creativity       .........................      ...... 1459
III. A PSYCHOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.................................................... 1483
A.   Patent Law          ........................................... 1484
B.   Copyright Law ......................................... 1492
C. Ill-Fitting Works........................................ 1501
C O N CLU SIO N ..............................................................................................................  1508
INTRODUCTION
The U.S. Constitution grants Congress the power to promulgate laws
[t]o promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for lim-
ited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective
Writings and Discoveries.'
Within the same clause and with the identical purpose of promoting in-
novation, Congress is authorized to grant exclusive rights in both artistic
works and scientific and technological inventions. Congress has acted to
provide both forms of intellectual property protection, with patent law
shielding primarily scientific and technological inventions and copyright
law principally covering artistic works. Despite the fact that Congress's
Associate Professor, Fordham Law School. For their creative discussions and comments, I thank
Arnaud Ajdler, Barton Beebe, Jamela Debelak, Rochelle Dreyfuss, Wendy Gordon, Hugh Hansen, Paul
Heald, Timothy Holbrook, Bert Huang, Justin Hughes, Sonia Katyal, Mark Lemley, Oskar Liivak, Clari-
sa Long, Gregg Macey, Greg Mandel, Florencia Marotta-Wurgler, Mark McKenna, Mark Patterson,
Mark Runco, Keith Sawyer, Susan Scafidi, Dean Keith Simonton, Henry Smith, Steve Smith, Robert
Sternberg, Jeannie Suk, Joseph Tartakovsky, and Ian Weinstein, as well as participants at the Ninth An-
nual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference and audiences at Fordham and New York University
Law Schools. I am grateful to Benjamin Arrow and Lindsay Zahradka for their first-rate research assis-
tance.
I U.S. CONST. art. I, § 8, cl. 8.

1441

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