1 Cum. Dig. Int'l L. & Rel. 1 (1930-1931)
International Movement of Films

handle is hein.journals/ilanrelat1 and id is 105 raw text is: CUMULATIVE DIGEST
OF
INTERNATIONAL LAW AND RELATIONS         RESEARCH ASSISTANTB
DIRECTOR
ELLERY C. STOWELL                                           ALBERT H. GARRETSON
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL   MARGARETS.RAMSEY
SECRETARY                 1901 F STREET NORTHWEST        FREDERIKA CRITCHETT
HELEN S. BRABROOK              WASHINGTON. D. C.            REBECCA MATTHEWS
INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT OF FILMS
Mussolini has said that three great discoveries, the discovery
of movable printing type, the discovery of the dark chamber for photo-
graphy and the discovery of the motion picture, mark three fundamental
steps in the progress of the human spirit, three formidable instruments
for the conquest and diffusion of culture; and of all of these Italy's
premier thinks the moving picture the most important because it talks
to the eyes, that is, it speaks a language comprehensible to all peoples
of the earth-4'
This statement becomes much more than opinion when we are told
that every week the moving picture reaches over 300,000,000 persons in
all parts of the world; that during 1927 and 1928 3,108,000,000 people
saw pictures of Lindberghts famous flight and subsequent good will tours.
The importance and significance of the moving picture in international
relations need not be pressed. The moving picture is today the mqst
powerful influence shaping the international attitude of the man in the
street. How else does the great bulk of humanity gain its impressions
of another people, their habits, characteristics and traditions? How
else can international propaganda so effectively reach the minds of mil-
lions?
Mussolini's interest in the moving picture as a primary educational
medium was undoubtedly a factor in the offer of the Italian Government
to create at Rome an International Educational Cinematogra.phic Institute
under the direction of the League of Nations, but to be carried out at
the expense of the Italian Government and established in a palace offered
by that Government.$V The Organic Statute of the Institute as approved
by the League Council on September 26, 1928, provides that the program of
the Institute as drawn up at the yearly meetings of the Governing Body
shall have due regard to the powers of the various international insti-
tutions (in particular the International Institute of Intellectual Co-
operation and the International Labor Office) and the work of any other
competent international body, in particular the Child Welfare Committee?/
The Organic Statute also provides that the Italian member of the Inter-
national Institute o Intellectual Cooperation be president of the Govern-
ing Body ex officio.v'N The present Director of the Institute is M. Luciano
de Feo of Italy. Mr. Carl E. Millikin, General Secretary of the Motion
1. The Responsibility of the Motion Picture Industry in Interna-
tional Relations, Jason Joy, Institute of International Relations, River-
side, California, Proceedings, Vol. 4, 1928, p. 169.
2. Resolution of the Assembly of the League of Nations, September
20, 1927.
3. International Educational Cinematographic Institute ... Report
to the Council on the Third Session of the Governing Body of the Institute,
Geneva, 1930, Sub-appendix E, Article X, p.21.
4. Ibid. Sub-appendix E, Article V, p. 21.

Reproduction by Permission of Buffalo & Erie County Public Library Buffalo, NY

Bulletin No. 45 and 46

November 9, 1931

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