36 Indus. & Lab. Rel. Rev. 378 (1982-1983)
The Role of Perspective-Taking Ability in Negotiating under Different Forms of Arbitration

handle is hein.journals/ialrr36 and id is 380 raw text is: THE ROLE OF PERSPECTIVE-TAKING ABILITY
IN NEGOTIATING UNDER DIFFERENT
FORMS OF ARBITRATION
MARGARET A. NEALE and MAX H. BAZERMAN*
This study investigates whether the ability of negotiators to adopt the
perspective of theit opponents is a key to success in negotiating under con-
ventional and final-offer arbitration. The authors tested this question in an
experiment in which 80 pairs of students engaged in two sets of negotiations.
The results suggest that both the perspective-taking ability of the negotiators
and the type of arbitration affect negotiations-as measured by concession
rate, number of issues resolved, and outcome success (the dollar value of the
contract obtained)-and such attitudes as perceived agreement with and con-
trol over the outcome. The authors also find that negotiating experience
affects various process and outcome measures of the negotiation as well as
perceived control over and agreement with the outcome.

A RBITRATION has become a commonly
used and highly visible alternative to
the strike, particularly within the public
sector. Furthermore, arbitration is spread-
ing beyond the realm of labor-management
negotiations, being used to resolve con-
flicts typically within the jurisdiction of the
courts, such as divorce actions.' This study
*Margaret Neale is Assistant Professor of Manage-
ment at the College of Business and Public Administra-
tion. University of Arizona. and Max Bazerman is Assis-
tant Professor of Organizational Behavior at the School
of Management. Boston University. This research was
funded by a grant from the National Science Founda-
tion. The authors thank James Driscoll and Thomas
KOchlau for nctuerous insightful cornmtetnts On
previous drafts of this paper.
1R. L. Bonn, Arbitration: An AlternativeSystem for
Handling Contract Related Disputes, Administrative
Science Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 2 (June 1972), pp.
254-64: William W. Notz and Frederick A. Starke,
'Final Offer versus Conventional Arbitration as

adopts a decision-making perspective of
the role of the negotiator under the two most
common     forms of arbitration-conven-
tional and   final-offer-to increase our
understanding of the negotiation process.
Although the use of arbitration proce-
dures has increased in recent years, our
knowledge of why various forms of arbitra-
tion differentially affect negotiator behavior
lags far behind. Viewing the bargaining
exchange from    a decision-making per-
spective allows us to apply to the analysis of
negotiations some of the lessons learned
from the extensive theoretical and empirical
work that has been done on decision mak-
ing. A unique characteristic of labor-man-
agement negotiations is the likely impor-
tance of negotiators' assessment of the de-
Means of Conflict Management, Administrative
Science Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 2 (June 1978), pp.
189- 203.

Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 36, No. 3 (April 1983). © 1983 by Cornell University.
0019-7939/83/3603 $01.00

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