22 Howard L.J. 169 (1979)
Austin L. Fickling: A Memorial and Retrospective

handle is hein.journals/howlj22 and id is 179 raw text is: Austin L. Fickling: A Memorial and
Retrospective
DALE C. ANDREWS*
LAWRENCE A. MINTZ**
INTRODUCTION AND BIOGRAPHY
On March 6, 1977, Associate Judge Austin L. Fickling of the
District of Columbia Court of Appeals died at the age of 62. Judge
Fickling was the first black jurist appointed to the court of appeals,
and at the time of his death was the second most senior judge on the
court in length of service.
Austin L. Fickling was a product of the District of Columbia.
He was born in Washington on May 11, 1914, and graduated from
Dunbar High School in 1932. He later attended Miner Teacher's
College. In 1935, he entered government service as a messenger and
eventually rose to the position of clerk in the Post Office
Department.
While working for the postal service Austin L. Fickling began
the study of law at Robert H. Terrell Law School.' He received his
* B.A., 1971, George Washington University; J.D., Cum Laude, 1976, American Uni-
versity Washington College of Law; associate, Galland, Kharasch, Calkins & Short, Washing-
ton, D.C.; former law clerk, 1976, the Honorable Austin L. Fickling, District of Columbia
Court of Appeals.
** B.A., 1973, University of Maryland; J.D., Cum Laude, 1976, Howard University
School of Law; associate, Finkelstein, Thompson & Levenson, Washington D.C.; former law
clerk, 1977, the Honorable Catherine B. Kelly, District of Columbia Court of Appeals, former
law clerk, 1976, the Honorable Austin L. Fickling, District of Columbia Court of Appeals.
The authors gratefully acknowledge the invaluable assistance of Dr. Doris Fickling, Mrs.
Jacqueline Mason, and the Honorable Hubert B. Pair.
1. Terrell Law School was named in honor of Judge Robert H. Terrell of the Municipal
Court of the District of Columbia. It operated until 1957, providing night classes for Blacks
interested in entering the legal profession.
Although constantly plagued with economic problems, the school produced, aside from
Judge Fickling, an inspiring number of black jurists including Judge Barrington D. Parker of
the Federal District Court, Judge Hubert B. Pair, retired, of the District of Columbia Court of
Appeals, Judges Margaret Haywood, John Fauntleroy, and William S. Thompson of the Supe-
rior Court of the District of Columbia, and former Judge Marjorie Lawson of the old Juvenile

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