11 Howard L.J. 264 (1965)
Some Concepts of Human Rights

handle is hein.journals/howlj11 and id is 274 raw text is: Some Concepts of Human Rights
ELIHU LAUTERPACHT*
May I, first, express my sense of personal privilege at having
been invited to participate in this Symposium, and, secondly,
compliment Howard University upon having developed and
brought to fruition the idea of this international gathering. I
must, in particular, congratulate Professor del Russo, who should
be proud and delighted to have succeeded so well in bringing
us all together in this grand cause. As the statement on the Sym-
posium program indicates, no subject could be of greater import-
ance than this one that we are gathered together to discuss - the
international law of human rights. Our organizers have provided
a feast of speeches on various aspects of the subject. From the
position in which I find myself, I suppose I ought to be regarded
as something of an hors-d'oeuvre - offering a variety of dishes,
each having something in common with the main courses which
follow, but not providing enough of each to affect the desire for
what follows.
Human rights can be considered on two planes, the nation-
al and the international. Both fall within our terms of refer-
ence. One of the most interesting phenomena in the history of
the protection of human rights is the interconnection between
national and international activity in the field. International
consciousness of human rights has grown out of national aware-
ness of the problem; and, in its turn, contemporary national
concern with the situation in many parts of the world itself
stems from the extent of such international awareness. The
work of the United Nations and the emergence of the European
Convention on Human Rights owe much to the concepts of hu-
man rights developed in the practice of France, the United King-
dom, and the United States.
And now one finds, in particular, the European Convention
on Human Rights reflected in the constitutions of many new
states, especially those which were formerly British dependent
territories. It will, I venture to believe, be ranked as one of the
great achievements of the United Kingdom that, in bringing its
former dependent territories to the point of full self-government,
it succeeded at the same time in endowing all but two with a
constitution which contains specific provisions on human rights,
* Trinity College, Cambridge, England.

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