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2 How. J. 1 (1926-1929)

handle is hein.journals/hjcj2 and id is 1 raw text is: 

Vol. 2. No. 1.                                            July 1926.

THE HOWARD JOURNAL.


                   ANNUAL MEETING.
   [OW:ING TO LACK OF  SPACE IT HAS NOT BEEN  POSSIBLE TO GIVE A
 VERBATIM REPORT  OF THE  MEETING, BUT  THE FOLLOWING   SUMMARY
 WILL GIVE SOME  IDEA OF THE  INTEREST OF THE TOPICS TREATED  BY
 THE SIVERAL SPEAKERS.]
 The   fifth annual meeting of the Leakue was held at the Caxton
 Hall on June 24th, 1925, with' Lord Henry Cavondish-Bentinck in
 the Chair. In opening the proceedings the Chairman congratulated
 the League on  the way  in which it had now  got  public opinion
 behind it, and on the progress it had made in ill the objects of the
 Society.
 Quoting   from the  Annual  Report, he noted among   these: the
 plea for a better probation system,, for an act to deal with mental
 deficiency, for women police, for women  magistrates, for prison
 nurses, for women doctors in women's prisons, for prison education.
 Then there were the protests against the silence rule, against months
 of solitary confinement, against needless short sentences-all of which
 had borne fruit.
 He   pointed out that although  in many  cases reform had  only
 reached the half way stage, yet the progress made was enough to
 put us in good heart for the future, and to give us some confidence
 that what the League thinks to-day Parliament will be thinking a
 few years hence. The most striking instance of success was perhaps
 the measure which includes a really proper probation system, for
 which the League  had  been working  for years.   The  Criminal
 Justice Bill had every chance of becoming law before the session
 ended.
                 PENAL  REFORM  IN  PARLIAMENT.
  Mr.  Pethick Lawrence,  who  spoke on  this subject, urged that
there was a special kind of work'for penal reform which the League
might do  in addition to the impetus for reform which might come
from the Home   Office, from the efforts of members of Parliament
and from the pressure of public opinion. The Home Office, lie said,
was primarily an administrative body and could hardly be expected
to make experiments, though it might respond to the iifluenceof some
outside body more free to experiment. The  Member  of Parliament
was bound  to rely on some outside source of information, in order
to discuss the wide range of subjects on which he was expected to
speak.  This particular Society was able to collect information, to
investigate, to suggest questions and generally to stand behind the
member  who  had his case to get together. Public opinion above all
was in need of impetus in relation to reform : it had no organised
method  of expression and needed to be co-ordinated by some such

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