73 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 395 (2004-2005)
Crowd Control: The Troubling Mix of First Amendment Law, Political Demonstrations, and Terrorism

handle is hein.journals/gwlr73 and id is 407 raw text is: Note
Crowd Control: The Troubling Mix of First Amendment Law,
Political Demonstrations, and Terrorism
Nick Suplina*
Introduction
The danger to political dissent is acute where the Government at-
tempts to act under so vague a concept as the power to protect do-
mestic security. Given the difficulty of defining the domestic
security interest, the danger of abuse in acting to protect that inter-
est becomes apparent.'
After each perceived security crisis ended, the United States has
remorsefully realized that the abrogation of civil liberties was un-
necessary. But it has proven unable to prevent itself from repeating
the error when the next crisis came along.2
When President Bush visits a city or town, local law enforcement, often
under the direction of the Secret Service, sets up free speech zones-areas
at a distance from the President's destination where demonstrators are per-
mitted to protest.3 The areas, documented in twelve cities,4 are out of sight
* J.D. expected 2005, The George Washington University Law School. Many thanks to
Amy Quinn, Annie Champion, and Owen Smith for generously donating their time and support.
I dedicate this Note in loving memory of my mother, Carole Suplina Keller, who, despite a
perpetual concern for my safety at protests, marched with me and the world on February 15,
2003.
1 United States v. U.S. Dist. Court, 407 U.S. 297, 314 (1972).
2 William J. Brennan, Jr., The Quest to Develop a Jurisprudence of Civil Liberties in Times
of Security Crises, 18 ISR. Y.B. HUM. RTS. 11, 11 (1988).
3 See James Bovard, Quarantining Dissent: How the Secret Service Protects Bush from
Free Speech, S.F. CHRON., Jan. 4, 2004, at D1; Don Corrigan, Behind the Bush: Secret Service
Forces Protesters and Journalists Away from Presidential Motorcade. Lawsuits Coming., ST.
January 2005 Vol. 73 No. 2

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