3 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 279 (1934-1935)
Principles of the Indian Law and the Act of June 18, 1934

handle is hein.journals/gwlr3 and id is 283 raw text is: The George Washington
Law Review
VOLUME III          MARCH, 1935              NUMBER 3
PRINCIPLES OF THE INDIAN LAW AND THE
ACT OF JUNE 18, 1934
HEINRICH KRIEGER
Duesseldorf, Germany*
The legal institutions concerning the Indians are often
thought of as a complex body of peculiar, mostly techni-
cal, rules, forming a system strange to the general law
and transitory in character. On June 18, 1934, Congress
passed an act by which attention is again attracted to
the field of Indian law, especially since that act points to
a further development of the Indian law as a permanent
part of American law. The adoption of the new act of-
fers an opportunity to review the principles of the legal
status of the American Indian; and to re-examine the
nature of the United States' special authority over the
tribal Indians.
THE ORIGINAL STATE OF INDIAN LAW
After America was discovered her conquerors were
faced by a population of a uniform race, unknown up to
that time. They did not form an organized community,
but were divided into uncivilized, independent tribes
or nations. These tribes resisted the conquerors;, wars
* The author of this article has been pursuing studies of a legal and sociolog-
ical fiature in this country as an Exchange Student at the University of Ar-
kansas 1933-34.
At present he holds a fellowship from the Notgemeinschaft der Deutschen
Wissehschaft under which he has been conducting research in the Library of
Congiess preparatory to publication of a dissertation on American Racial Law.
279

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