91 Foreign Aff. [i] (2012)

handle is hein.journals/fora91 and id is 1 raw text is: FOREIGN
A FFA IRSD\P
JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 2012
VOLUME 91, NUMBER 1
The Clash of Ideas
A 90th-Anniversary Special Section
Making Modernity Work           Gideon Rose                                    3
Today's troubles are real, but not ideological: they relate more to policies than to
principles. The postwar order of mutually supporting liberal democracies with mixed
economies solved the central challenge of modernity, reconciling democracy and
capitalism. The task now is getting the system back into shape.
How We Got Here                                                                7
Selections from the Foreign Affairs archives tracing the ideological battles of the
past century and the evolution of the modern order. The authors include Harold
Laski, Victor Chernov, Paul Scheffer, William Henry Chamberlin, Giovanni
Gentile, Erich Koch-Weser, Hamilton Fish Armstrong, Isaiah Berlin, Benedetto
Croce, Leon Trotsky, C. H. McIlwain, Alvin Hansen and C. P. Kindleberger,
Geoffrey Crowther, David Saposs, G. John Ikenberry, Azar Gat, Ronald Inglehart
and Christian Welzel, and Nancy Birdsall and Francis Fukuyama.
The Future of History Francis Fukuyama                                        53
Stagnating wages and growing inequality will soon threaten the stability of con-
temporary liberal democracies and dethrone democratic ideology as it is now
understood. What is needed is a new populist ideology that offers a realistic path
to healthy middle-class societies and robust democracies.
The Democratic Malaise CharlesA. Kupchan                                     62
The advanced industrial democracies are facing a crisis of governability. Globalization
is widening the gap between what voters demand and what their governments
can deliver. Unless the leading democracies can restore their political and economic
solvency, the very model they represent may lose its allure.
The Strange Triumph of Liberal Democracy ShlomoAvineri                       68
Intelligent observers of Europe in the 1930s thought its fiture belonged to communism
or fascism and would have ridiculed the notion that decades later the entire continent
would be democratic. New books by Jan-Werner Miler and Eric Hobsbawm
illuminate the changing fortunes of the continent's great ideologies.

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