5 FOIA Update 1 (1984)

handle is hein.journals/foiaupd5 and id is 1 raw text is: 

U.S. Department of Justice
Office of Information and Privacy


Vol. V, No. 1
Winter 1984


   FoTA UPDATE






A                         Senate Passes Extensive


FOTA Reform Legislation


  After hearings and protracted delib-
erations extending over two sessions
of Congress, the Senate on February
27 unanimously passed S. 774, the
comprehensive package of FOIA re-
form amendments supported by the
Administration.
  Full Senate approval of S. 774 had
been expected last year, based upon
the bipartisan efforts of Senators
Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Patrick
Leahy (D-Vt.), but was delayed for
several months as a result of concerns
(primarily regarding national security
issues) raised by Senator David


Durenberger (R-Minn.). Ultimately,
however, the bill cleared the Senate
with relatively little controversy after
Senator Hatch agreed to schedule a
hearing on April 3 before his Consti-
tution Subcommittee of the Judiciary
Committee addressing such concerns.
   S. 774 now moves to the House of
 Representatives, where Government
 Information, Justice and Agriculture
 Subcommittee Chairman Glenn Eng-
- lish (D-Okla.) has awaited final Sen-
ate action for more than two years be-
fore considering FOIA reform. In a
                    Cont'd on p. 6


On Agency Practice

   Wide Variety of FOJA Training Available


  Over the years since federal
agencies first began implementing the
Freedom of Information Act, they
have become increasingly aware of
the value of up-to-date training in this
area.
  Today, a wide variety of basic and
advanced training courses on the
FOIA are available throughout the
Federal Government. In 1984, ap-
proximately 25 governmentwide
FOIA training programs will be held
in Washington, D.C. alone, and 18
more sessions are scheduled in re-


      New Feature
  In this issue, FOIA Update inau-
gurates a new recurring feature, Un-
der Advisement (page 9), which
will point out pending litigation cases
in which FOIA issues of particular
significance are expected to be decid-
ed in the near future.


gions throughout the country. In addi-
tion, many agencies will offer in-
house or on-the-job training for their
FOIA   access professionals and
attorneys.
  A review of the FOIA training
practices at various federal depart-
ments and agencies reveals several
consistent trends in FOIA training.
New employees in the FOIA area usu-
ally attend at least one of the major
FOIA training programs and there-
after return for refresher sessions
from time to time.
  Additionally, several agencies offer
one-day or two-day in-house sessions
on the FOIA which usually focus on
technical questions and issues partic-
ular to those agencies. Educational
programs offering updated training
and advanced work are always
popular and, as federal agencies have
developed greater FOIA expertise in
recent years, such programs have be-


come heavily subscribed.
  The major sources of FOIA train-
ing are:
  0 The Department of Justice's
Legal Education Institute (LEI)-
which offers five sessions yearly of
its two-day course, The Freedom of
Information Act for Attorneys and
Access Professionals.  In 1984, four
of these sessions will be offered in
Washington and the fifth will be held
in Los Angeles. The faculty is com-
prised of access law experts from sev-
              Cont'd on next page

        Inside Update
OIP Guidance: Congres-
  sional Access Under
  the FOIA  .............. pp. 3-4
FOIA Counselor: The
  Unique Protection of
  Exemption 2  ......... pp. 10-11
Index to FOIA Update,
  Vols. I-IV   . ......... pp. i-iv

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 2,700 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Access to this content requires a subscription. Please visit the following page to request a quote or trial:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?