23 Ent. & Sports Law. 1 (2005-2006)
Prime Time Anytime: Wireless Video on Demand

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Meets Reality          and Product Integration
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ABA FORUM ON THE
ENTERTAINMENT AND
SPORTS INDUSTRIES
VOLUME 23, NUMBER 
--              -      .          .     WINTER 2006

Pinned Down

Labor Law and Professional Wrestling
Part II: Workers in the Billion Dollar Pro-Wrestling Industry
This is the second in a three-part series on labor law issues in pro wrestling - the crossroad
of sport and entertainment.
By Jamie Sharp
How to classify pro wrestlers
rofessional wrestlers are a unique breed of workers who have no real labor
classification. While professional wrestling certainly requires a great deal of
athleticism, professional wrestlers are not considered professional athletes
because they do not compete in legitimate athletic competition.
Similarly, although professional wrestlers participate in scripted story-
lines, they are generally not considered actors because they do not perform
on a stage or on movie sets.1 Since professional wrestling uses elements of
both professional sports and entertainment, perhaps the best way to classify
professional wrestlers is to follow Vince McMahon's lead and call them
sports entertainers.
Continued on page 16
Independent Film Festival Report
Sundance 2006
By Dan Satorius
f the hundreds of film festivals in the United States, the premiere one for
the independent film industry is the Sundance Film Festival held each
January in Park City, Utah. Sundance has defined and directed the inde-
pendent film industry for many years. It is the over-caffeinated, over-crowded and
over-affected must-attend event of the year for the independent film business.
Festivals vs. markets
Film festivals are supposed to be different from film markets. A market is where
buyers and sellers meet to buy and sell films and television programs. The IFP mar-
ket in New York and the American Film Market in Santa Monica are examples of
film markets. Real Screen and Hot Docs are examples of television markets.
Continued on page 36

Prime Time
Anytime:
Wireless Video
on Demand
By Eleanor Sasis
hen I moved into my new flat,
I possessed the only television
set among my roommates. To
put my TV in the living room for all to
share - or not: That is the question. If
I moved my TV into the living room, I
would run the risk of it not being avail-
able for use when my shows are on.
One of my roommates could be watch-
ing the news or worse, Wife Swap!
What was I to do?
The future of my television viewing
(and network television) got brighter
when Apple Computer Inc. announced
that consumers would be able to
download select NBC Universal, Sci Fi
Channel, USA Network, Disney and
ABC television shows from the iTunes
Music Store. For $1.99, you can down-
load the latest episode just one day
after it airs on your TV.1 Downloaded
shows may then by synced to the
newest versions of the full-sized iPod,
letting you watch your shows whenev-
er and wherever.
Apple's iTunes Store features full sea-
sons of The Office, Law and Order,
and more. It's just a matter of browsing
the iTunes Music Store listening to find
what you want, clicking to buy and
downloading the stutter-free, ad-free
Continued on page 33

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