44 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1221 (2010-2011)
Over-Parenting

handle is hein.journals/davlr44 and id is 1231 raw text is: Over-Parenting
Gaia Bernstein* and Zvi Triger**
Today the child is king. Child rearing practices have changed
significantly over the last two decades. Contemporary parents engage in
Intensive Parenting. Parents devote their time to actively enriching the
child, ensuring the child's individual needs are addressed and that he is
able to reach his full potential. They also keep abreast of the newest child
rearing knowledge and consistently monitor the child's progress and
whereabouts. Parents are expected to be cultivating, informed, and
monitoring. To satisfy these high standards, parents utilize a broad array
of technological devices, such as the cellular phone and the Internet,
making Intensive Parenting a socio-technological trend.
Many legal doctrines aim at defining the scope of parental
responsibilities; yet, courts, legislatures, and scholars alike have ignored
this significant change in child rearing practices. Unattended, the law
already plays an important role in enhancing the socio-technological trend
of Intensive Parenting. In the area of custody disputes, legislatures and
courts effectively enforce Intensive Parenting norms. Other recent legal
developments, such as the constriction of the Parental Immunity Doctrine
and recurring transformation of preferred child rearing practices into
Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law.
Associate Professor of Law, The Haim Striks School of Law, The College of
Management, Rishon Le Zion Israel. We are grateful for their insightful comments and
suggestions to: Kerry Abrams, David Barnes, Naomi Cahn, June Carbone, Cary
Cheifetz, Jennifer Collins, Robert Dreesen, Rachel Godsil, Maya Grosz, Laura
Heymann, Tsachi Keren-Paz, Holning Lau, Solangel Maldonado, Tamar Morag, Shari
Motro, Melissa Murray, Kim Pearson, Claudette St. Romain, Elizabeth Scott, Ed Stein,
Elizabeth Vinhal, and Sarah Waldeck. We would also like to thank the participants at
the Cardozo Family Law Workshop, the College of Management School of Law
Faculty Seminar, the Emerging Family Law Scholars Conference, the Motherhood
Conference at the University of Denver, the Seton Hall Faculty Retreat and the Seton
Hall Brownbag. For excellent research assistance thanks go to Julianne Befeler, Kristin
Makar, Kimia Musavi, Evan Rosenberg, and Peter Slocum. Finally, this Article was
generously supported by the summer research stipend of the Seton Hall University
School of Law and by the Young Scholars Encouragement Program at the College of
Management School of Law.

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