41 Crim. Just. & Behavior 4 (2014)

handle is hein.journals/crmjusbhv41 and id is 1 raw text is: 






CAREER STAGE THEORY AND TURNOVER

INTENT AMONG CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS



MARIE   L. GRIFFIN
Arizona State University
NANCY L. HOGAN
Ferris State University
ERIC  G. LAMBERT
Wayne State University




Prior research on correctional staff turnover intent and turnover generally assumes that staff are impacted by the workplace
in a similar manner regardless of career stage. This study examined whether correctional officers (N = 2,621) with a
Southwestern correctional agency differed in their level of turnover intent across different career stages, and whether the
impact of work environment variables on turnover intent varied across career stages. Results indicated that turnover intent
was lowest among staff with less than 1 year into their careers, and that the effects of work environment variables on turnover
intent varied greatly across the 4 career stages. Commitment to the organization was the only work environment variable to
be a significant predictor of intent to leave among four career stages, with a negative association in each of the four career
groups.

Keywords: correctional staff; job satisfaction; organizational commitment; turnover intent; career stage theory




   A CAREER STAGE ANALYSIS OF CORRECTIONAL STAFF TURNOVER INTENT

   Staff turnover remains  a significant problem in the field of corrections (Tipton, 2002). In
2004,  nearly half of U.S.  correctional departments   reported facing  difficulties recruiting
and retaining staff (Sumter, 2008).  In a speech at the American  Correctional  Association's
(ACA)   Winter  Conference,   ACA   President  Gwendolyn Chunn recognized turnover as a
salient issue that drained valuable resources from  correctional organizations (ACA,   2005).
It is estimated that the annual rate of correctional staff turnover ranges from  15%  to 25%
(Blakely  & Bumphus, 2004; Minor, Wells, Angel, & Matz, 2011). It is not surprising that
correctional scholars  continue to explore  issues of retention and  turnover given  that cor-
rectional institutions are labor-intensive organizations, with  staff accounting for approxi-
mately  70%   of all expenditures  at a typical correctional facility (Camp  &  Gaes,  2002).
Correctional  officers are particularly important, given  that their primary responsibility is


AUTHORS' NOTE: The authors thank   Janet Lambert for editing and proofreading the article. The authors
also thank the anonymous reviewers and the editor for their comments and suggestions. These comments and
suggestions improved the article. All the authors contributed equally and are listed in random order
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Marie L. Griffin, School of Criminology &
Criminal Justice, Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave., Ste. 600, Phoenix, AZ 85004-0685; e-mail:
Marie. Griffin@asu. edu.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR, Vol. 41, No. 1, January 2014,4-19.
DOI: 10.1177/0093854813503638
 2013 International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology


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