36 Crim. Just. & Behavior 5 (2009)

handle is hein.journals/crmjusbhv36 and id is 1 raw text is: 






PREDICTING RECIDIVISM BY MENTALLY

DISORDERED OFFENDERS USING THE LSI-R:SV

A. MURRAY FERGUSON
JAMES   R. P. OGLOFF
Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (Forensicare)
and the Centre for Behavioural Science, Monash University
LINDSAY THOMSON
Carstairs Hospital, Scotland


The Level of Service Inventory-Revised: Screening Version (LSI-R:SV) has proven to validly predict reoffending in general
offender populations but has not previously been studied specifically with offenders who have a major mental illness,
including those with a dual diagnosis. This research project measures the validity of the LSI-R:SV for use with 208 mentally
ill offenders who were released from a secure forensic hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Results indicate that the LSI-R:SV
is a good predictor of recidivism among mentally disordered offenders. However, the LSI-R:SV does not reliably predict
recidivism in individuals who attracted a dual diagnosis. Further research needs to reevaluate risk factors associated with
recidivism in offenders with a dual diagnosis.

Keywords: risk assessment; dual diagnosis; mentally ill (disordered) offender; violence risk; recidivism




A lthough once believed to be no more likely to   engage  in criminal behavior than members
     of the general population, individuals with a major mental disorder are now known  to be
at an elevated risk for such behavior (Angermeyer,  2000; Monahan,   1992; Wallace,  Mullen,
&  Burgess, 2004; Walsh,  Buchanan,  &  Fahy, 2002). In Victoria, Australia, it has been found
that 25%  of individuals serving a jail term have had prior psychiatric contact, and this is true
of one  third of those  incarcerated for a violent offense  (Wallace  et al., 1998). Mullen,
Holmquist,  and Ogloff (2003)  reported in a nationwide review of Australian epidemiological
data that 13.5% of male prisoners and 20.0%   of female prisoners had reported having a prior
psychiatric admission, and 40.0%  of males  and 50.0%  of females incarcerated at the time of
the study reported having had a prior psychiatric assessment. In addition, the number of indi-
viduals with  major  mental  disorders entering the  criminal justice system  has drastically
increased during the past 30 years (Ogloff, Davis, Rivers, & Ross, 2007; Wallace et al., 2004).
The  vast majority of these individuals will at some point be released from prison, and there-
fore it is of great importance to assess their risk of reoffending while living in the community.


                          MENTAL ILLNESS AND OFFENDING

   Bonta, Law,  and  Hanson  (1998)  undertook  a meta-analysis  of recidivism  among  men-
tally ill offenders and found across 64 unique samples  the mean  rate of general and violent


AUTHORS' NOTE: Correspondence concerning this   article should be addressed to A. Murray Ferguson,
Centrefor Forensic Behavioural Science, Thomas Embling Hospital, Fairfield, Victoria, Australia 3078; e-mail:
Murray.ferguson@med.monash.edu.au.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR, Vol. 36 No. 1, January 2009 5-20
DOI: 10.1177/0093854808326525
0 2009 International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology


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