35 Crim. Just. & Behavior 5 (2008)

handle is hein.journals/crmjusbhv35 and id is 1 raw text is: 







ASSESSING RISK FOR VIOLENCE

IN   ADOLESCENTS WHO HAVE

SEXUALLY OFFENDED


A   Comparison of the J-SOAP-II,

J-SORRAT-II, and SAVRY




JODI  L. VILJOEN
Simon Fraser University
MARIO SCALORA
LORRAINE CUADRA
SHANNON BADER
VERONICA CHAVEZ
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
DANIEL   ULLMAN
Lincoln Regional Center
LISA  LAWRENCE
Western New England College


As the youth justice system has evolved, clinicians have been increasingly asked to make judgments about the likelihood that
a youth who has committed a sexual offense will reoffend. However, there is an absence of well-validated tools to assist with
these judgments. This study examined the ability of the Juvenile Sexual Offense Recidivism Risk Assessment Tool-II
(J-SORRAT-II), Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment
Protocol-II (J-SOAP-II) to predict violent behavior in 169 male youth who were admitted to a residential adolescent sex
offender program. Total scores on the SAVRY and J-SOAP-II significantly predicted nonsexual violence but none of the instru-
ments predicted sexual violence. The J-SOAP-II and SAVRY were less effective in predicting violent reoffending in youth aged
15 and younger than in older youth. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Keywords: risk assessment; violence; sex offending; juvenile; adolescent




C linicians   are commonly   asked to make  judgments  about the likelihood that a youth who
     has committed   a sexual offense will reoffend. Courts  often seek  clinicians' opinions
about  a youth's violence risk level in making  decisions about  whether  a youth  should be
transferred to adult court (Kent v. United States, 1966), and in determining appropriate place-
ments  and dispositions (Hoge,  2002). In treatment settings, knowledge  about a youth's risk
is used to assist with treatment planning  by  identifying risk factors that may be targeted


AUTHORS'   NOTE:   This study was supported by a grant from the Woods Charitable Fund, Inc. The authors
would like to thank Larry Cook for his assistance with this project and the staff at Lincoln Regional Center
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jodi Viljoen, PhD, Department of Psychology,
Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5A 1S6; e-mail: jviljoen
@ sfu. ca.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR, Vol. 35 No. 1, January 2008 5-23
DOI: 10.1177/0093854807307521
0 2008 American Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology
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