11 Crim. Just. 1 (1983-1984)

handle is hein.journals/crijust11 and id is 1 raw text is: 











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Coming Soon - Criminal Law
Certs Before the U.S. Supreme
Court
By  William W. Greenhaigh
  Note: William W. Greenhaigh is a Professor of Law at
Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. -He is
the immediate past chairperson of the Criminal Justice Section
and currently serves as a member of its governing Council.
  For a number of years, I have analyzed the writs on which
the U.S. Supreme Court has granted certiorari in order to de-
termine ahead of time what they may, or may not, decide with
respect to criminal law issues. The questions presented to
the Court for its 1983-84 term, as I view them, are set forth
below - excerpted from my complete analysis of pending
cases, which was far too lengthy (500 pp.) for inclusion in this
small space. I believe the briefs and arguments presented in
the following cases will be the most important that have come
before the Court in the last 10 years.
             FOURTH AMENDMENT
Colorado v. Quintero, No. 82-1711
657 P.2d 948 (Colo. 1983) Question presented: Whether the
Colorado Supreme Court mistakenly applied the exclusionary
rule to an undisputed good-faith seizure of stolen property.
Massachusetts v. Sheppard No. 82-963
387 Mass. 488 (1982) Question presented: Whether the fourth
amendment  requires the inflexible application of the exclu-
sionary rule when a police officer has reasonably and in good
faith relied upon a search warrant to seize items specified in
the warrant application, but the warrant is subsequently in-
validated for judicial error in failing to specify the items in the
warrant itself.
United States v. Leon No. 82-1771
Unpublished (9th Cir. 1983) Question presented: Whether the
exclusionary rule should be modified so as not to bar admis-
sion of evidence seized as a result of a reasonable, good-faith
reliance on a search warrant that is subsequently held to be
invalid. Whether the Court will address the good-faith excep-
tion issue presented by this case will depend on the Court's
determination as to whether the decision in Gates is to be ap-
plied retroactively. It Gates is not viewed as a decision that
clearly breaks with the past (see United States v. Johnson,
_    U.S.    ,   102 S. Ct. 2579, 2587), the totality of the
circumstances test of Jones would apply. If the Court deter-
mines that Gates is to be retroactively applied and if the Court
finds the warrant here to be supported by probable cause
(which would appear likely after comparing the affidavit in the
warrant application of the present case to the affidavit in Jo-
nes,) the good-faith exception issue need not be addressed.
Michigan v. Clifford No. 82-357
Unpublished (Mich. Ct. App. 1982) (per curiam) Questions
presented: Whether a warrantless entry to determine the origin
of a fire made at the first available time after the flames have
been extinguished violates the fourth and fourteenth amend-
                                (Continued On  Page 6)


Ocoher   Council Meeting  in Hilton  lead, SC.
  The fall meetng of the Criminal Justice Section e
Concil  will 30e hld October 2i9-30 at  ariot  S Hilton
Hoed   iesrt. Alt Section ember  aire invited to attend
the- btusiness mreeting and social activities being
p-lanned. Among  agend a  iems is a proposed principle
o  the use of hearsay in then grand justandards for
lawY enforcement access o recods a progress report
on  eseairch  o eligbility nd reco'spent  qlestions in
the provision of indigent d efense , a   a proposal from
the ABA's Individual Rights, & Responsibilities Se~ction
or a joine ponec on death pennaly defense. Contact
the wcion's  staff ofAices or a complete agenda and
Aeting   intformeratiern



Committees Gear Up for Action:
Tough, New Issues to Be Tackled
  Some   800 Criminal Justice Section members  are ser-
ving on 30 CJS  committees  this year. They were ap-
pointed in August by Section Chairperson  Richard H.
Kuh  of Warshaw  Burstein Cohen Schlesinger &  Kuh in
New  York City. Kuh succeeded  William W. Greenhagh
as chairperson after the Section's annual meeting in
Atlanta.
  Among   new  committees organized  by Kuh are those
on Prosecutorial Discretion, Providing Defense Services
(indigent defense), and Drunk Driving. New committee
chairs convened  during the annual meeting to discuss
tentative work plans. A sampling of these plans ap-
pears below.
  CRIMINAL APPELLATE ISSUES (Calvin L. Fox,
Assistant  Attorney General  for the State of Florida,
Miami,  FL -  305/377-5441) Work  will continue on pro-
j ects including ineffective assistance of counsel claims
at the appellate level; a proposed manual on litigating
habeas  corpus claims; a report on the need for a
national court of review; and a review of appellate
backlog  in the Circuit Courts of Appeal.
  CRIMINAL TAX CASES (Terry P. Segal, Segal,
Moran  &  McMahon,   Boston, MA  -  617/720-4444)
Committee  members   will provide input into a project
designed  to tighten disclosure of federal tax returns to
state prosecutors. Possible amendments  to Rule 6(e) of
the F.R.Cr.P. will also be considered.
  DRUNK DRIVING (Judge David A. Horowitz,
Superior  Court, Van Nuys,  CA  -  213/901-3533) A
survey on how  the problem is being handled in the
various states and in other countries will be conducted.
                              (Continued On  Page  2)

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