13 Colo. J. Int'l Envtl. L. & Pol'y 445 (2002)
Why Sharks May Have Nothing to Fear More than Fear Itself: An Analysis of the Effect of Human Attitudes on the Conservation of the Great White Shark

handle is hein.journals/colenvlp13 and id is 455 raw text is: Notes and Comments
Why Sharks May Have Nothing
to Fear More Than Fear Itself: An
Analysis of the Effect of Human
Attitudes on the Conservation of
the Great White Shark
Romney Philpott*
I. INTRODUCTION
A series of shark attacks in the southeastern United States induced
news magazines to label the summer of 2001 The Summer of the
Shark. Theories regarding the high number of shark attacks surfaced
from a variety of sources in academia and the media, blaming everything
from the profusion of scuba tours offering dives with sharks to the in-
creased number of people at the beach.' One of the more strident voices
was that of Sean Paige, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute.
Paige claimed that the fledgling shark conservation programs of Florida
and the federal government, the first extensive shark protection efforts in
U.S. history, have driven shark populations to dangerously high numbers
in reckless disregard for the public safety implications.2
* Romney Philpott is a class of 2003 candidate for the Juris Doctor degree at the
University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder, Colorado. He received his B.A. in
English with a Concentration in Environmental Studies from St. Olaf College in 1995.
1. Sean Paige, Editorial, PITSBURGH POST-GAZETrE, Sept. 9, 2001, 2001 WL
22225169; Bob Marshall, More Humans Means Larger Shark Problem, 16 TIMES-
PICAYUNE, Sept. 9, 2001, at 16, 2001 WL 26201405.
2. Paige, supra note I.

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