2006 Companion Newsl. 1 (2006)

handle is hein.journals/cmpnion2006 and id is 1 raw text is: 










-t     Test our knotwedge
       Cross, rd Puzzle


                                             Foals Overcome


                                             Struggle for


                                             Life Thanks


2 'to Your Help


lo-


Boston Capital


Campaign


           - ,I, y ' ' tir' h,,
atoimodating  cats, dogs and small animals
separately. An emergency unit equipped with
a triage area, five examination rooms and a
diagnostic imaging room to provide efficient
and effective emergency care to critically-ill
animals. Now imagine an adoption center
with spacious dog runs and large cat condos
with sky lights to provide proper sunlight to
homeless animals. Imagine comfortable
visitor *home' rooms with couches that will
give animals and potential adopters a real
chance to become acquainted. Imagine a
place where homeless and abused animal
can see the sunlight every day know thre
comfort of theii     ''
stay until they b

Now  stop imagin i

Thanks to the qr'
individual donors. Bolston s iri Mris A
Angell building is almost complete. The
construction phase of the Helen Schmid
Stanton Clinical Care Center and the (opt
Animal Care and Adoption Center, will be
finished June 19. We are very excited to
share our new space with you.

The new Helen Schmidt Stanton Clinical Care
Center will expand our current medical center
to offer an impressive 22 examination roo
including five additional emergency romr
clustered around multi-purpose treatment
areas where routine tests can be perfotrme
This space will provide multiple waiting act.
designated for various animals and an MRI
(rite tom eumnsdv the I ids ACedC,


caicer treatment center will provide a more
efficient space to treat cancer patients.

Additionally, the Copeland Animal Care and
      fi Center will be almost four times
      than the previous adoption center. This
      Ill include a spay/neuter clinic,
      i quarters (to help prevent the spread
      lion), an education and training room
  ,medical treatment room. To accommodate
  he thousands of dogs, cats and small
riimals we care for every year, this center
will provide Large, spacious and comfortable
quarters, equipped with plenty of light,
windows and toys! There will be visitor rooms
and counseling areas for the staff to visit
with potential adopters.

Although we are very close to raising the
S16.6 million to fund this new facility, we
have raised S15 million to date and still need
Io close the gap. Of the gifts we have raised
I  far. 22 have been at the level of $100,000
or more. We have received two commitments
of 1500,000 and five at $1,000,000 or more.
Our two Largest commitments have been from
Dr. Frank Stanton, former president of CBS
inc. and the Copeland Faminl f  oundatron.

We need to raise the remaining funds as
quickly as possible. Contributions at any
level are greatly appreciated and gifts and
pledges of 525.000 or more will have a
significant impact on our ability to reach
our goal. If you would like to help with th


Please visit
mspca.org/companion
to  donate!


                             sca' anc
        in nn oi ana a,  rot. The' bodies
  'e emaciated from severe manutntion. Yet
    as their eyes that carried the most pain.
    h was the condition of 17 Pregnant Mare
    ne (PMU) foals that came to the MSPCA
    nial Care and Adoption Centei in Methuen
    October.

  1  foals are the controversial offspring of
pegnant  mares whose urine is painfully
harvested on special farms to make hormone
replacement drugs for estrogen therapy
(note: synthetic drugs are available as an
alternative). These young horses are taken
from their mothers long before they are
ready. Caring for these foals is difficult and
risky. Unfortunately, some people are unable
or unwilling to provide for the PMU foals
they purchase from these farms. By the
time someone placed a call to the MSPCA, the
four-month-old draft horses were in
dire condition.

The foals arrived at Nevins Farm where they
began the long and difficult journey of
regaining their health. All were malinounshd
and severely compromised, facing a senrou
struggle for life at a very young age.

Critical-care teams began immediate
treatment. Volunteers worked around the
clock. And slowly, the foals began to
respond. While their immune systems
still recovering from severe infections at
time of this newsletter's printing, thei
weight, size and muscle density had ale.
made a full recovery. And while all hai
groving iapidly in in eflrtri in ll th '


                              W, ,1   , Ithis
itsef   has proven t.  a ri  s-  for
these brave foals.

After overcoming bacterial infections and a
leg abscess, Ashton, a leader among the
foals, started to show signs of yet another
condition. He suffered from Epiphysitis, a
health issue that often impacts draft horses
when their bones grow too quickly, resulting
in painful joints. Although his condition has
since been treated, this is just a reminder of
the lifelong health problems these foals will
face due to previous malnourishment and
neglect. They will require lifelong medical
attention, treatment and most importantly,
loving care, in order to help prevent any
future complications.

If you would like to help animals like these
foals who come into our care after abuse or
neglect, visit www.mspca.org/companion to
make  a donation today.


  1VI



12 *)


                     Striving for More Advanced


              k      Cancer Equipment -


                     In Memory of Tucker


                   part of out iamly Lairy and Patti Hai remember hi a', part of their
    is. Over three years ago. Tucker, an eight-year-old yellow Labrador Retriever,
    isiastically wagged his tail as former MSPCA-Angell President. Dr. Larry Hawk, and his wife.
    took  him home from an adoption center. Since then, Tucker led the best life a dog could
    ne; a warm home, lots of food, mounds of attention and the company of Loving owners.
    n November 2005, Tucker was diagnosed with Lymphoma - a common type of cancer.

    r immediately began treatment for Lymphoma at Angell. Although he was surrounded by
    'enced. board-certified veterinary oncologists with highly advanced technology...the
    r overcame him. In January 2006, Tucker passed away.

    Angell Animal Medical Center's Radiation Oncology Department uses highly specialized
    nology to treat cancer. including a piece of equipment called a linear accelerator. A linear
    eterator is used to deliver high energy radiation to treat cancerous tumors. Although we have
  , technology. an updated machine would allow us to treat even more types of cancer in more
  mals...and we can do this with your help.

In memory of Tucker. and others who have touched our hearts, we are determined to raise
the funds necessary to buy a new tinear accelerator and provide this treatmerit to more
animals. You can help by making a gift in memory of Tucker or in honor of your own loved
one. For Tucker and all of our treasured four-legged (or less!) friends who have fought or
-1l fiht rancer please make a gift at wnr mpta-ong turL6' All gifts will go toards a


Hats Off to ou
Volunteers

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