66 Cath. U. L. Rev. 543 (2016-2017)
Death Row Dogs, Hard Time Prisoners, and Creative Rehabilitation Strategies: Prisoner-Dog Training Programs

handle is hein.journals/cathu66 and id is 567 raw text is: 






DEATH ROW DOGS, HARD TIME PRISONERS, AND
      CREATIVE REHABILITATION STRATEGIES:
         PRISONER-DOG TRAINING PROGRAMS


                           Paul J. Larkin, Jr.'


I. THE APPEARANCE,  DISAPPEARANCE,  AND REAPPEARANCE OF
      REHABILITATION         ..............................................546
II. THE DEVELOPMENT  OF PRISONER-DOG   PROGRAMS  .........................550
    A. The Relationship Between Humans and Dogs............           .....550
    B. The Growth ofAnimal-Assisted Therapy     ............................552
    C. The Development of Prisoner-Dog Programs           .................555
III. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PRISONER-DOG  PROGRAMS   ........    ..........562
IV. CONCLUSION           ......................................... .......572
V. APPENDIX          ........................................................573

  To err is human.
  To forgive, canine.
  -Unknown

  Who  would have thought that man's best friend could also be a prisoner's best
hope for a second chance?
  Decades  ago, publications by Konrad Lorenz, a recipient of the Nobel Prize
in Physiology or Medicine, and Boris Levinson, a child psychologist, separately
described the nature and therapeutic benefits of what is known as the human-
animal bond, the close relationship that a person can form with a companion
animal, particularly a dog.' Animal Assisted Therapy Programs (AAT  or



* Senior Legal Research Fellow, The Heritage Foundation; M.P.P., George Washington University,
2012; J.D., Stanford Law School, 1980; B.A., Washington & Lee University, 1977. The author
would like to thank Rachel Barkow, Emily Dunton, Timothy Ryan Farley, Thomas Graves, Ann
Hertzog, Lee W. Larkin, Gregory E. Maggs, John G. Malcolm, Edward L. Mensh, Thomas Ranieri,
Imelda Samaniego, and John-Michael Seibler for excellent comments on an earlier draft of this
Article. The author would also like to thank Thomas Ranieri and Timothy Ryan Farley for
outstanding research assistance. Any mistakes are mine.
    1. See KONRAD LORENZ, MAN MEETS DOG (Marjorie Kerr Wilson trans., 2002) (1954)
(The whole charm of the dog lies in the depth of the friendship and the strength of the spiritual
ties with which he has bound himself to man.); BORIS LEVINSON, PET-ORIENTED CHILD
PSYCHOTHERAPY xiii--xiv (1969) [hereinafter LEVINSON, PET-ORIENTED CHILD PSYCHOLOGY];
Boris M. Levinson, The Dog as Co-therapist, 48 MENTAL HYGIENE 23, 32, 33, 59, 60, 61 (1964)
[hereinafter Levinson, The Dog as Co-therapist]; Boris M. Levinson, Pets: A Special Technique in
Child Psychotherapy, 46 MENTAL HYGIENE 243, 243, 248 (1962) [hereinafter Levinson, Special
Technique in Child Psychology]; see also, e.g., JAMES A. SERPELL, IN THE COMPANY OF ANIMALS:


543

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