About | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline Law Journal Library | HeinOnline

25 Cap. U. L. Rev. 101 (1996)
White Cultural Matrix and the Language of Nonverbal Advertising in Housing Segregation: Toward an Aggregate Theorty of Liability

handle is hein.journals/capulr25 and id is 123 raw text is: WHITE CULTURAL MATRIX AND THE LANGUAGE OF
NONVERBAL ADVERTISING IN HOUSING
SEGREGATION: TOWARD AN
AGGREGATE THEORY OF LIABILITY
REGINALD LEAMON ROBINSON*
INTRODUCTION      ..................................                   103
I. WHITE CULTURAL MATRIX AND THE LANGUAGE OF NONVERBAL
ADVERTISING       .................................                118
A. The Text of the White Cultural Matrix: Racism, White
Supremacy, and Beyond ........................ 118
B. The Text of the Language of Nonverbal Advertising ...... 125
1. Advertising and basic motivations    .............. 135
2. Advertising and predicate (or object) thinking    ...... 141
C. Intertextuality of White Cultural Matrix and the Language of
Nonverbal Advertising ......................... 156
II. SECTION 3604(C) VIOLATIONS AND FAIR HOUSING JURISPRUDENCE:
THE LIMITS OF THE INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY MODEL ......... 158
A. Advertising Preference of the Fair Housing Act of 1968 . . . 158
1. Advertising preference prohibitions: Section 3604(c) . . 162
2. Regulations as guiding policy    ................. 165
B. Individual Liability, Racial Preference Violations, and Fair
Housing Jurisprudence     ....................... 167
Copyright © 1996, Reginald Leamon Robinson.
. Associate Professor, Howard Law School, Washington, D.C.; B.A., (Phi Beta
Kappa, Magna Cum Laude) 1981, Howard University; M.A., (Political Science) 1983,
University of Chicago; Exchange Scholar, Departments of Political Science and
Economics, 1984-85, Yale University; J.D., 1989, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D.
Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Chicago, Summer 1993.
Thanks to Shirley Mays and the editors of the Capital University Law Review for inviting
me to participate in the Capital University Law Review Symposium on the State of the
City; Dorothy A. Brown (Cincinnati) for her encouragement and our many conversations;
Angela Y. Robinson, my partner, for her support and editorial assistance, and Zanetta
Moore Driggers (class of 1995), Diane Haley (class of 1997), Jena Martin (class of 1997),
Theresa Rowell (class of 1997), and Felice Robinson (class of 1998), my research
assistants, for their diligence and energy. I owe thanks to Professors Andrew Gavil
(Howard), Tracey Meares (Chicago), and Adrienne Davis (American) for their thoughts,
direction, and ideas. I also owe a debt to Valerie Railey, Reference Librarian, Howard
Law School, for her dedication and unswerving research support. Finally, I would like to
thank Dean Henry Ramsey, Jr., and Howard University for providing a summer research
grant and research assistance to support this project. Of course, as usual, the politics and
errata of this article belong exclusively to me.

What Is HeinOnline?

HeinOnline is a subscription-based resource containing nearly 3,000 academic and legal journals from inception; complete coverage of government documents such as U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Reports, and much more. Documents are image-based, fully searchable PDFs with the authority of print combined with the accessibility of a user-friendly and powerful database. For more information, request a quote or trial for your organization below.



Short-term subscription options include 24 hours, 48 hours, or 1 week to HeinOnline with pricing starting as low as $29.95

Contact us for annual subscription options:

Already a HeinOnline Subscriber?

profiles profiles most