3 Belmont L. Rev. 1 (2016)

handle is hein.journals/belmolre3 and id is 1 raw text is: 











             SOCIAL MEDIA AND FLASH

                     INFRINGEMENT:

      LIVE MUSIC CULTURE AND DYING IP

                        PROTECTION


           PROFESSOR MICHAEL M. EPSTEIN*


I. IN T R O D U C T IO N   ..........................................................................................  1
II. THE LIMITS OF IP PROTECTION FOR LIVESTREAMING OF CONTENT ....... 2
III. TODAY'S USER-CONTROLLED STREAMING AND DISTRIBUTION APPS .. 4
IV. THE CONCEPT OF FLASH INFRINGEMENT. ...................................... 7
       A . Spontaneity   .......................................................................... . .  8
       B . E phem erality   ........................................................................ . .  9
       C. Aggregated Distribution in a Social Networking Environment 10
V . LEGAL RAM IFICATIONS .....................................................................  15
       A . Pursuing  the  A pps .................................................................  16
       B . Pursuing  the  U ser .................................................................  18
V I. STRUCTURAL REMEDIES ..................................................................  22
       A . N o  Phone  Z one  ...................................................................   22
       B . Signal  B locking  ...................................................................   23
       C. Use Flash Infringement to Market Band or Album ............. 24
       D. Make Concertgoers Sign Adhesion Contracts ..................... 25
       E. Control Distribution through Stageit or Similar Service .......... 26
V . C O N CLU SIO N   ......................................................................................  27


                         I. INTRODUCTION

       This article interrogates issues of music intellectual property rights
infringement at live performances. I am especially interested in music
infringement at live concerts and DJ-driven mash-up parties, and the use of
technologies to transfer protected content by smartphone-or remote


*   Professor of Law and Director of the Amicus Project, Southwestern Law School.
Supervising Editor of the Journal of International Media and Entertainment Law, published
by the American Bar Association and the Donald E. Biederman Entertainment and Media
Law Institute at Southwestern. The author thanks Natasha Mehlum, a Biederman Scholar at
Southwestern, and Professor Robert C. Lind for assistance in the preparation of this Article.

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